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Any recommendations on winter tires for southern Ohio?

I also have a 1990 Wrangler. Could I buy a set of 15" rims and tires and swap them between the two vehicles as needed? Or would Cherokee rims fit on the Wrangler (15"s are much cheaper).

Thanks



Thanks
 

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While not entirely impossible, the odds of your 1990 Wrangler and 2016 Cherokee wheels having the same bolt pattern/offset/width/hub bore are pretty slim. Plus, not sure if 15 inch wheels would clear the brake calipers on your Cherokee.
 

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I have General Altimax Arctic winter tires on both Cherokees and had them on previous vehicles as well. Rugged winter tire with great dry road capabilities and long wearing.


And yes, as stated above 17" is it for KLs. I had a set of 16" with same bolt pattern and offset but did not clear the calipers....
 

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I also had the General Altimax Arctic, while in eastern MA.. They where great for snow and inexpensive -
 

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Been running the AT tires on my car with no problems and I live at a ski resort. I put Nokian All Weather tires on my Ford Escape and ran them both summer and winter with no problems. I keep the AT tires on because I do some off-roading in the summer and hate swapping tires for the seasons, although dedicated winter tires will give you the best traction in the winter.
 

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Been running the AT tires on my car with no problems and I live at a ski resort. I put Nokian All Weather tires on my Ford Escape and ran them both summer and winter with no problems. I keep the AT tires on because I do some off-roading in the summer and hate swapping tires for the seasons, although dedicated winter tires will give you the best traction in the winter.
Have run Nokian All Weather snow tires year round on my Jeeps, works well for me in snow country!
 

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I have three like new tires that I took off my Jeep after about 5000 miles to switch to some oversized wild-peaks. One of the tires had sidewalk damage so I decided to just swap them all out. You’d just have to buy one new tire and I’d be willing to sell the other three for a decent price depending on shipping. They are nokian wrg3 225/65/17.
 

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Any recommendations on winter tires for southern Ohio?

I also have a 1990 Wrangler. Could I buy a set of 15" rims and tires and swap them between the two vehicles as needed? Or would Cherokee rims fit on the Wrangler (15"s are much cheaper).

Thanks
Others are answering the tire question, so I'll address your second question:

Taken from here: https://www.quadratec.com/c/reference/wheel-bolt-patterns-typical-lug-nut-torque-specifications

Your 1990 Wrangler uses 15-16" wheels, with an SAE 5x4.5 bolt pattern, or 5 lugs x 4.5 inch spacing.
Your 2016 Cherokee uses a metric 5x110mm bolt pattern, or 5 lugs x 110mm spacing. 110mm = 4.33 inches, so no, your Wrangler wheels won't fit.

Hope this helps. :)
 

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Any recommendations on winter tires for southern Ohio?

I also have a 1990 Wrangler. Could I buy a set of 15" rims and tires and swap them between the two vehicles as needed? Or would Cherokee rims fit on the Wrangler (15"s are much cheaper).

Thanks



Thanks
If we are talking a non Trail Hawk Cherokee..................
If we are talking a 4WD Cherokee..........

I have a 2014 Limited 4WD with AD2.
I changed out the OEM tires to Goodyear Assurance Weather Ready tires 2 years ago.
They are classified All Season but are All Weather tires by their emblem on the sidewall. That is the 3 mountain peak/snowflake emblem.
My understanding of these tires is that the tread remains flexible below 40 degrees F. unlike conventional All Season tires.
That allows more flexible tread on the road below 40 degrees. That is key to traction in the winter.

I run those tires year round. If you live in the snow belt behind one of the Great Lakes then you may very well just want to put on 4 AT or snow tires to fit your particular Cherokee. But having them rated all weather will give you the flex you need. Just look for that emblem.
My understanding is that emblem is required on some roads/areas in Canada during the winter.

The Assurance tires work well for me year round and seem to have better flex than the OEM ones did.
But that's just my humble opinion.
 

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I'm looking at getting winter tires as well. Thinking I'm going to get Michelin X-Ice Xi2, unless I'm allowed to go under the load rating. The 2019 trailhawk has a load rating on the door of 105. That means I need to stick to SUV tires and not regular car tires. And the most narrow I found with a load rating of 105+ is 225 (general), but most are 235/245. My understanding it most tire shops will not install tires below spec.
 

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I'm looking at getting winter tires as well. Thinking I'm going to get Michelin X-Ice Xi2, unless I'm allowed to go under the load rating. The 2019 trailhawk has a load rating on the door of 105. That means I need to stick to SUV tires and not regular car tires. And the most narrow I found with a load rating of 105+ is 225 (general), but most are 235/245. My understanding it most tire shops will not install tires below spec.
show up with rims and tires and they'll mount anything.

Personally i try to stay to the stock size to avoid major speedo issues
 

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I'm looking at getting winter tires as well. Thinking I'm going to get Michelin X-Ice Xi2, unless I'm allowed to go under the load rating. The 2019 trailhawk has a load rating on the door of 105. That means I need to stick to SUV tires and not regular car tires. And the most narrow I found with a load rating of 105+ is 225 (general), but most are 235/245. My understanding it most tire shops will not install tires below spec.
Interesting subject here. I too like to go narrower for winter tires, when possible. I have a Latitude so I couldn't really go narrower than 225, because that is the minimum width for any Cherokee.
The TH is a different animal. It is only a few hundred pounds heavier than non THs, so why 105 instead of 102 for the others ? Does it have something to do with off-roading capabilities ? Either way, going to a lower load rating (than recommended) can create problems... with your insurance perhaps ? Liability ?
I wouldn't chance it... so if you can get a 235 with a 105 load rating, that's a decent compromise (to go narrower) and stay legit.

As far as SUV tires or car tires... : I think many [winter] tires in the 245/65/17 range are P rated anyway, but I'm not sure they even use *P* vs *LT* ratings (at least not Tire Rack) anymore.
 

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I'm looking at getting winter tires as well. Thinking I'm going to get Michelin X-Ice Xi2, unless I'm allowed to go under the load rating. The 2019 trailhawk has a load rating on the door of 105. That means I need to stick to SUV tires and not regular car tires. And the most narrow I found with a load rating of 105+ is 225 (general), but most are 235/245. My understanding it most tire shops will not install tires below spec.
Interesting subject here. I too like to go narrower for winter tires, when possible. I have a Latitude so I couldn't really go narrower than 225, because that is the minimum width for any Cherokee.
The TH is a different animal. It is only a few hundred pounds heavier than non THs, so why 105 instead of 102 for the others ? Does it have something to do with off-roading capabilities ? Either way, going to a lower load rating (than recommended) can create problems... with your insurance perhaps ? Liability ?
I wouldn't chance it... so if you can get a 235 with a 105 load rating, that's a decent compromise (to go narrower) and stay legit.

As far as SUV tires or car tires... : I think many [winter] tires in the 245/65/17 range are P rated anyway, but I'm not sure they even use *P* vs *LT* ratings (at least not Tire Rack) anymore.
I've had way more claims than i would like because poeple seem to be attracted ti my ride.... But not once has anyone asked... What size tires are you running.


Run whatever you want
 

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I've had way more claims than i would like because poeple seem to be attracted ti my ride.... But not once has anyone asked... What size tires are you running.


Run whatever you want
I worked in EMS for years. There are claims, and then there are... serious claims with fatalities involved where evidence is gathered, vehicles scrutinized... and finger pointing happens. You may not have experienced such an event yourself. Best to have everything to spec, in my book anyway.
 

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I have no knowledge of Southern Ohio. You don't state your snow concerns. If your snow is light to medium, I would buy an All-Season M+S tire like Bridgestone Dueller H/L Allenza and leave them on all year. If you are worried about heavy snow and/or ice I HIGHLY recommend the Nokian Hakkapeliitta. These are, from my experience, the best snow/ice tires made for an SUV.
 

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saw snow forecast up North of us & thought of you. got yer winter tires on yet?
Funny you mention that. You must've seen forecast for the prairies or further out West, because in the East... it's bloody warm. We're hitting 73F today, has been at or near 70 for almost a week here, very warm for this time of the year.

Was discussing batteries with a forum member a few hours ago from Alberta, they are freezing there.

It'll get cooler here by the end of the week, not before. I usually swap my tires late October, so getting there. Since I do them at home, I can wait for just the right time..
 
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