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So... it was time to get new tires for the '15 Trailhawk. Original ones still had tread left but I had a humming sound that I thought might be tire-related.
New tires....still humming. Figure it's a bearing so I'll let the dealership sort that out and rely on my Maxcare warranty.

The brakes needed replacing too and I wanted to do that before taking it in, just to rule out that wasn't causing the hum. Dealership wanted $1300 so I decided to do it myself for $327. How hard could it be, right?

The rear set screws came out fine but both fronts stripped the hex 'hole' when I tried to remove them. No worries as I drilled the screw heads off and the rotors came off fine.
Of course now I don't have a set screw. I used the remaining stud of the screw to hold the rotor in place and line up the holes. Works fine but I can hear the dealership now..... something about leaving this type of work to the professionals...yadda yadda.

So here's the point of this post: has anyone else stripped the heads and had to drill them? Did you leave them as is or remove the threaded part of the screw that remains? I guess I could try some penetrating spray and an 'easy out' or whatever the real name of those bits is.

Toss me some ideas please. It's not a problem, just something my CDO wants me to correct.

- Will
 

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Struggling to understand. I have never done Cherokee brakes.
Does this show the stud of the set screw: Mopar Guide Pin - 68225303AA | MoparOnlineParts | Mopar Online Parts
If you replaced the wheel hub would that solve the problem? New hubs would be good anyway because they are rusty and you will end up with a cracked tone ring like I did.
Then use new set screws with some anti seize compound so you can get them out next time.
 

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The little pin is not structural, it's just there to keep the rotor "clocked" correctly to the hub so when you put in the lug bolts things are lined up.

You can use a "left-handed drill bit", to get the screw to come out fairly easy. It just drills in reverse and after enough metal is contacted the screw should just zip right out.

An Ez Out is designed for when you really buggered things up.

You might be able to rent the necessary tools from your local auto parts store.
 

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I second ^^.

Those set screws are not ''necessary'' at all. But if you want to remove them, ask your auto parts store for the right tool.

@Renthorin : the part you linked to seems to be it. I don't know why they say 'Export' in the description (that should mean overseas KLs) because the part number matches what I find on US and canadian Mopar reseller sites (part# 06509906AA )
 

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Same as AZJeeper and Mark_.... These are not structural and only used to hold the rotor flush against the hub while assembling. I broke one of mine off a few months ago in my first all-4-wheel rotor change and didn't bother replacing it. Those little hex heads on a screw get all bound up by rust and freeze into place. Since the head is relatively shallow, IMO, it's a weak design element. Whoever thought of this design never lived in the Northeast with it's salted street winters.

Just make sure your new rotors are flush with the hub surface when reassembling it and you'll be ok. BTW, I think the reason they added the screw is because the Cherokees have lug BOLTS instead of NUTS for the tire. So there's nothing else on the hub face for the rotor to rest on while you reassemble the caliper, tire etc. Since it needs to be repair-idiot-proof (take your car to Walmart auto and you'll see what I mean by this), by using a set screw, it stays against the hub face long enough to reassemble even if done by an absent minded technician.
 

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Oh right, I know it's not structural. I may go the route of a reverse drill bit. That sounds kind of fun. :)
I understand the OCD angle here. I know you know it's not a critical fastener, haha. But yeah, getting it 'fixed' is something I'd want too..
 

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I was thinking CDO was either Compulsive Disorder of Obsessiveness (kind of a dyslexic OCD), OR Cash Disbursement Officer (AKA "Significant Other"). Looks like it's the first, right?
 

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Refer back to the title of this Post.
So how do you remove the rotors?
Generally when I replace brake pads I also replace the rotors. (Or at least my Jeep dealer does)
Is the bolt a guide pin or does it actually hold to rotor to the hub?
 

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Refer back to the title of this Post.
So how do you remove the rotors?
Generally when I replace brake pads I also replace the rotors. (Or at least my Jeep dealer does)
Is the bolt a guide pin or does it actually hold to rotor to the hub?
Because our hubs don't have studs, car manufacturers decided they would 'set' the rotors in place with these set screws. Their purpose is to align the rotor's lug holes with the threaded hub lug holes, and also to hold the rotor in place so it doesn't fall off, until the caliper with pads is in place, which will hold the rotor. It's more of a convenience fastener.

So when you want to remove a rotor, you have to remove this small set screw. Unless... the set screw no longer exists... As you know, rotors have an inherent tendancy to stick to our hubs, requiring us to bang on them a little bit to remove them, so... once the wheel is fastened, chances are next time you remove it, the rotor won't rotate out of alignment with the hub holes, even if you lift the caliper.
 
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