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omg that was so funny. thought there would be an epic fail but it worked! I love the guy that came running to catch a ride on the bus
 

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My best ever was when I started sliding, did a complete 360, and then continued on my way without even slowing down. Real Jim Rockford stuff.

I'd like to say it was because I'm the best **** driver there ever was, but there was probably some luck involved. haha
 

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Dang, you must be as old as I am! :grin:

LOL.

After I wrote that I briefly wondered if anyone here would even know who Jim Rockford was.

A buddy of mine back then even bought himself an exact replica of Jim's Firebird. Same color, same everything. He and I took it on a cross country trip. Oh, the stories I could tell from that trip... haha
 

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LOL.

After I wrote that I briefly wondered if anyone here would even know who Jim Rockford was.

A buddy of mine back then even bought himself an exact replica of Jim's Firebird. Same color, same everything. He and I took it on a cross country trip. Oh, the stories I could tell from that trip... haha
This is Jim Rockford. At the tone leave your name and message, I'll get back to you............
 
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LOL.

After I wrote that I briefly wondered if anyone here would even know who Jim Rockford was.
I think most of us are. :)

Lindy said:
A buddy of mine back then even bought himself an exact replica of Jim's Firebird. Same color, same everything. He and I took it on a cross country trip. Oh, the stories I could tell from that trip... haha
Sounds cool, feel free to share... there's even a "Road Trip" forum ( https://jeepcherokeeclub.com/449-road-trips/ ) for that! :D
 

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My best ever was when I started sliding, did a complete 360, and then continued on my way without even slowing down. Real Jim Rockford stuff.I'd like to say it was because I'm the best **** driver there ever was, but there was probably some luck involved. haha
nice to meet you. you're first I've met on auto forums who has done this too. I much prefer the 360 to the 180, both of which I've had the terror of doing. luck is when preparation meets opportunity, so, well done, you >:D
 

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I'm not old. I was a teenager when I watched Jim Rockford 0:)
A bit after that but for me the most memorable 360 :
 

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Oh yeah. That was a great one. My friends and I used to make a point of watching the Indy 500, so we saw that 360 as it happened.

There was actually some skill in the one I did. I was driving a front wheel drive Dodge Avenger coupe and I was a little too cocky about the ability of the car with the snow tires I had on.

I was going too fast for conditions when I moved from one lane to another. The rear end totally went out on me, so far that I knew instantly that I couldn't steer out of it. So in an attempt to keep the car on the road I then steered into the spin, thus allowing me to complete the 360. Of course I was also bleeding off some speed and when I was approaching the complete 360 I then turned the wheel the other way, the snow tires got some traction, and there I was, going straight again in the right direction.

But of course luck was also a big factor and quite frankly it taught me a good lesson. It was an experience, despite the adrenaline rush, that I don't want to go thru again. haha
 

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Oh yeah. That was a great one. My friends and I used to make a point of watching the Indy 500, so we saw that 360 as it happened.

There was actually some skill in the one I did. I was driving a front wheel drive Dodge Avenger coupe and I was a little too cocky about the ability of the car with the snow tires I had on.

I was going too fast for conditions when I moved from one lane to another. The rear end totally went out on me, so far that I knew instantly that I couldn't steer out of it. So in an attempt to keep the car on the road I then steered into the spin, thus allowing me to complete the 360. Of course I was also bleeding off some speed and when I was approaching the complete 360 I then turned the wheel the other way, the snow tires got some traction, and there I was, going straight again in the right direction.

But of course luck was also a big factor and quite frankly it taught me a good lesson. It was an experience, despite the adrenaline rush, that I don't want to go thru again. haha
My most memorable *stunt* wasn't as flashy as a 360, but... scary. Small FWD car with winter tires, driving on a rather isolated 55 mph 2-lane highway, had been driving more slowly because of snow falling and then the skies cleared up and my right foot went down a bit... Didn't anticipate the black ice in a nice long RH bend, was going about 75 mph and the rear began to swing out... To my left across the road, a big rock formation, and there I was at close to a 45 degree angle in the other lane, sweating and hoping... a lot. I got lucky ; no oncoming cars or big rigs so I had all of the 2 lanes to myself, and the skid did not progress further *out*. With some white knuckles (not good) I got the car out of this first skid but got into that dreaded pendulum action, so swung out the other way, then the other way... a few times, then got it to go straight again. I wish I could say skill was involved, there was some I guess (steer into the intended direction, don't over-correct, right foot off teh throttle and NO brakes, etc...) but luck was my best friend there. And a little stupidity had gotten me into that situation to begin with...


I remember when I drove my first FWD car, a 1980 VW Rabbit : FWD was new and my dad bought winter tires for the front only, because well a lot of folks put winter tires on the back for RWD because you want traction at the wheels with power, right ? Nope... not with a FWD, haha. It took one or two winters before this mentality evolved...
 

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I recall my best "pendulum," back in the late-70's or early '80's. My best friend and I had gone out in my family's full-size Chevy station wagon to pick up lunch. We were heading back on snow-covered Pennsylvania roads, up a fairly steep hill, when the back end stepped out at about 40 mph. The conversation went something like:
Me: <steering into the skid>
Kurt: Turn in to it!
Me: Done! (as the car continues to swing side to side...)
Kurt: Turn the other way!
Me: Did it!
Kurt: You want me to shut up now?
Me: Yes please, I'm busy! :D
 
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My most memorable *stunt* wasn't as flashy as a 360, but... scary. Small FWD car with winter tires, driving on a rather isolated 55 mph 2-lane highway, had been driving more slowly because of snow falling and then the skies cleared up and my right foot went down a bit... Didn't anticipate the black ice in a nice long RH bend, was going about 75 mph and the rear began to swing out... To my left across the road, a big rock formation, and there I was at close to a 45 degree angle in the other lane, sweating and hoping... a lot. I got lucky ; no oncoming cars or big rigs so I had all of the 2 lanes to myself, and the skid did not progress further *out*. With some white knuckles (not good) I got the car out of this first skid but got into that dreaded pendulum action, so swung out the other way, then the other way... a few times, then got it to go straight again. I wish I could say skill was involved, there was some I guess (steer into the intended direction, don't over-correct, right foot off teh throttle and NO brakes, etc...) but luck was my best friend there. And a little stupidity had gotten me into that situation to begin with...


I remember when I drove my first FWD car, a 1980 VW Rabbit : FWD was new and my dad bought winter tires for the front only, because well a lot of folks put winter tires on the back for RWD because you want traction at the wheels with power, right ? Nope... not with a FWD, haha. It took one or two winters before this mentality evolved...

So, one more story and this one regarding the merits? of an all wheel drive system.

I was driving my all wheel drive Infiniti coupe in exactly the same conditions you just described. About 70mph. Came over a hill in a slight curve and hit black ice. Now under normal cruising speeds/conditions the Infiniti is 100 percent rear wheel drive until it senses the need to adjust. So that rear wheel drive only caused my rear end to swing out on the black ice. I immediately counter steered. Meanwhile the all wheel drive system kicked in and the car snapped rather jarringly into a straight head condition.

So, no big deal, but it freaked me out a bit as it happened because I felt like I didn't have any control over the car, it was doing what the computer was telling it to do and meanwhile I'm counter-steering. It was almost like I was fighting with the car, trying to control the car one way while the car was doing its own thing. It made me wonder if I would of been better off not counter-steering or if I potentially could of made the situation worse by doing so. Plus, the all wheel drive system of course reacted a split second faster than I did.

Anyway, I didn't like the experience although the system worked as designed and all was well. But since that incident I've decided to drive (in the winter) only cars which are default front wheel drive, since a front wheel drive car is less likely to have the rear end swing out on you in a situation like that..
 
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So, one more story and this one regarding the merits? of an all wheel drive system.

I was driving my all wheel drive Infiniti coupe in exactly the same conditions you just described. About 70mph. Came over a hill in a slight curve and hit black ice. Now under normal cruising speeds/conditions the Infiniti is 100 percent rear wheel drive until it senses the need to adjust. So that rear wheel drive only caused my rear end to swing out on the black ice. I immediately counter steered. Meanwhile the all wheel drive system kicked in and the car snapped rather jarringly into a straight head condition.

So, no big deal, but it freaked me out a bit as it happened because I felt like I didn't have any control over the car, it was doing what the computer was telling it to do and meanwhile I'm counter-steering. It was almost like I was fighting with the car, trying to control the car one way while the car was doing its own thing. It made me wonder if I would of been better off not counter-steering or if I potentially could of made the situation worse by doing so. Plus, the all wheel drive system of course reacted a split second faster than I did.

Anyway, I didn't like the experience although the system worked as designed and all was well. But since that incident I've decided to drive (in the winter) only cars which are default front wheel drive, since a front wheel drive car is less likely to have the rear end swing out on you in a situation like that..
I'm on the fence about FWD vs AWD on icy roads... From my bad experience I learned that you can lose the rear on a FWD car, and further reading told me that yes they can lose the rear, and when they do the skid is harder to recup. You bring up a good point about the nannies in more recent vehicles though : they change the ways we were taught... and the way a car behaves.
I had a moment driving an ambulance in freezing rain once : the narrow 50 mph 2-lane county road was wet, until it wasn't coming out of a corner... We saw 2 cars in the ditch about 1/8 mile ahead so my partner and I both went "Uh-oh". I was doing about 50 on the straightaway and immediately pushed the tranny into N, both feet away from pedals and took a deep breath... And then it started to sway... I remember my partner telling me rather loudly to not touch the brakes (heh..) and stay off the gas (duh..) and me just telling him to hang on for the ride... So we went by the 2 ditched cars going about 25 by now, still swinging a bit, and then I was able to park it on the shoulder. Nobody hurt there, so I called dispatch and told them to get us a salt truck asap. I think we waited about 20 minutes, salt was layed down and away we went...


Edit : the ambulance was a Dodge Ram van 3500 weighing about 8K pounds, on all season tires heh. You don't want to ditch that... if you can avoid it...
 

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I'm on the fence about FWD vs AWD on icy roads... From my bad experience I learned that you can lose the rear on a FWD car, and further reading told me that yes they can lose the rear, and when they do the skid is harder to recup. You bring up a good point about the nannies in more recent vehicles though : they change the ways we were taught... and the way a car behaves.
I had a moment driving an ambulance in freezing rain once : the narrow 50 mph 2-lane county road was wet, until it wasn't coming out of a corner... We saw 2 cars in the ditch about 1/8 mile ahead so my partner and I both went "Uh-oh". I was doing about 50 on the straightaway and immediately pushed the tranny into N, both feet away from pedals and took a deep breath... And then it started to sway... I remember my partner telling me rather loudly to not touch the brakes (heh..) and stay off the gas (duh..) and me just telling him to hang on for the ride... So we went by the 2 ditched cars going about 25 by now, still swinging a bit, and then I was able to park it on the shoulder. Nobody hurt there, so I called dispatch and told them to get us a salt truck asap. I think we waited about 20 minutes, salt was layed down and away we went...


Edit : the ambulance was a Dodge Ram van 3500 weighing about 8K pounds, on all season tires heh. You don't want to ditch that... if you can avoid it...
To clarify, I look for AWD vehicles like my Jeep, which default to FWD when conditions are good, instead of an AWD car like my Infiniti which is RWD as the default.

Default rear wheel drive is great for the summer as cars handle better when going thru curves, etc. But in the winter the default FWD gives you better traction on slippery roads from the get go. In the example I gave, my hunch is that if I would of hit that same exact situation with my Jeep the rear end wouldn't of swung out at all as the rear wheels wouldn't of been powering me down the road. It's that split second of RWD hitting ice and breaking loose before AWD and traction control kicks in.

But I'm sure how it reacts depends on a lot of factors. And no, I will never be able to undo my automatic responses to the rear end breaking loose, so hopefully the AWD/Traction control system works with me instead of against me.

And for anyone who has lived down South their whole lives, you probably have no idea what we are even talking about. :)
 
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Most favorite time was during and ice storm.
I needed to make a left, and the XJ just going
straight. I shifted out of 4x4, hit e-brake and
swung the ass end around. Once I was at the
right angle, I shifted back to 4x4 and gunned
it.. Made the left hand turn perfectly! In 4x4
I was going straight into a median. Also no
ABS, Traction, jack ****! LOL!!
 
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Default rear wheel drive is great for the summer as cars handle better when going thru curves, etc. But in the winter the default FWD gives you better traction on slippery roads from the get go. In the example I gave, my hunch is that if I would of hit that same exact situation with my Jeep the rear end wouldn't of swung out at all as the rear wheels wouldn't of been powering me down the road. It's that split second of RWD hitting ice and breaking loose before AWD and traction control kicks in.
I'm my 50 years of driving in New England winters I have learned to hate FWD vehicles for winter driving. While they provide better traction to get moving because of the extra weight over the front tires you lose all control if the front tires start to slip because the front wheels are powering the vehicle as well as steering. Where as with RWD if the front looses grip you can use the throttle to help control the car or if the rear wheels lose grip you can still steer. Plus most of the traction disadvantage of RWD can be negated with some ballast over the rear axle.

Of course the real secret to winter driving is proper winter tires.



Sent from my motorola one 5G using Tapatalk
 

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Worst thing about FWD in the winter is I can't do donuts. I've learned to
drift in 4WD which can be a lot of fun.
 
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