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Discussion Starter #1
Serious question. Are you really worried/concerned about your fuel mileage? I've read several threads about people watching their fuel consumption and I don't get it. You purchased a Jeep, a full-time 4WD vehicle that has never been known for fuel economy due to shape, drive systems.... ??? I buy vehicles for what they are. A Jeep is a Jeep. If I was concerned enough about fuel economy to monitor it, I would buy a Prius or some econobox.
 

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Sure! Why not be happy that my Jeep can do so well at "Jeep stuff," AND get good fuel mileage as well? :)
 

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With the price of gasoline now days it behooves one to do whatever is necessary to achieve the best gas mileage the Jeep is capable of. I never expected to get the gas mileage of a Prius or other cars but I do want to get the best mileage possible with my setup.
 

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Maximizing is fine. But keeping track of it on a continuous basis is a recipe for frustration. It is what it is - a Jeep. I guess if you want better gas mileage go with the 2.4 engine in a compass.
 

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Serious question. Are you really worried/concerned about your fuel mileage? I've read several threads about people watching their fuel consumption and I don't get it. You purchased a Jeep, a full-time 4WD vehicle that has never been known for fuel economy due to shape, drive systems.... ??? I buy vehicles for what they are. A Jeep is a Jeep. If I was concerned enough about fuel economy to monitor it, I would buy a Prius or some econobox.
1. Gasoline is an ongoing expense. Most people pay at least some attention to all their expenses. Obsessing over mileage calculations might be overkill for most of us, but on the other hand, paying NO attention to what a vehicle is consuming and what one is paying for fuel strikes me as oddly cavalier.

2. The Cherokee may not be an econobox, but neither is it a HEMI-powered monster. It's designed to be a reasonably efficient Jeep to operate, regardless of which engine is chosen. Even 4x4 Cherokees are not full-time 4WD vehicles. They rely on FWD whenever traction from the rear wheels is not needed.

I don't hand-calculate mileage on our Cherokees, but I check the system-reported mpg occasionally. I know it's somewhat inaccurate, but I just want ballpark figures. The V6 gets relatively poor mileage because of the way my wife uses it and where we live: almost no highway driving; lots of short trips; lots of hills to climb. I accept that. The turbo does somewhat better, which is what I expected/hoped for when choosing that engine. I get on the highway a bit more as well. I don't think I'm saving a huge amount of money, but if nothing else, I appreciate not having to buy gas as often as I might.
 
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I never even look at the pump readout and as you prepay at the pump I just wait for the click. Don’t worry be happy!
These things have to be great on gas as I’ve never run out of fuel yet according to the gas gage olllllllo


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Discussion Starter #8
1. Gasoline is an ongoing expense. Most people pay at least some attention to all their expenses. Obsessing over mileage calculations might be overkill for most of us, but on the other hand, paying NO attention to what a vehicle is consuming and what one is paying for fuel strikes me as oddly cavalier.......
I get it but what are you going to do about it if you find your regular MPG is 20? Nothing. What one is paying for fuel is completely different. Assuming another premium fuel is cheaper and convenient to buy, not buying it would be cavalier. When not winter and decent weather I commute by bicycle. Not for fuel but for health reasons. Other than walking, biking or carpooling your mileage is what it is and no amount of fretting will help. My 2.0T with start/stop technology is about as good as you can go. My trade in had a turbo also but it had an economy setting you could put it on to slightly detune the turbo when traveling flat on the highway. That might have helped pick up 1-2 MPG but in the Jeep - not so much. My belief is just enjoy what it is. The best 4WD SUV made. That comes with lower fuel economy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lastly, I only drive about 5,000 miles per year. If I had to commute and drove 10-20,000 miles per year - and dollars spent behind the wheel mattered - I would have a Honda HR-V or similar. I care more about driving enjoyment and vehicle capability than anything else while driving.
 

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Lastly, I only drive about 5,000 miles per year. If I had to commute and drove 10-20,000 miles per year - and dollars spent behind the wheel mattered - I would have a Honda HR-V or similar. I care more about driving enjoyment and vehicle capability than anything else while driving.
See, the way i see it...if you bought a Cherokee and DON'T care about mpg...you bought the wrong vehicle. Tell me where you can beat the Cherokee mpg with a decent 4x4 system and towing capacity of 4500lb.
 

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See, the way i see it...if you bought a Cherokee and DON'T care about mpg...you bought the wrong vehicle. Tell me where you can beat the Cherokee mpg with a decent 4x4 system and towing capacity of 4500lb.
I hear you. I said I don't watch the mileage. I bought the Cherokee because of the capability - not the mileage. Nothing else does, in its size, regardless of mileage.
 

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Yes, I watch mine. I did not buy the Jeep as a off road vehicle (2019 2.0T Limited) but as a commuter who lives in a state that has some nasty winters. Same reason I bought my wife one (2018 Latitude 6cyl + tow package)). I drive mine almost 24k miles a year so, ya its important to me. THAT said, I have been VERY happy with the 2.0T mileage.

I care enough about it to have kept logs in an iOS app since day one of ownership (I bought it with 7 miles on it). matter of fact, I have a whole thread detailing my mileage for a good bit. (with pics and all).

If you're REALLY interested, my average MPG since July 3 2018, is 31.6 (according to the app I use). More in the summer, Less in the winter.
 

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....Yes, I watch mine. I did not buy the Jeep as a off road vehicle (2019 2.0T Limited) but as a commuter....If you're REALLY interested, my average MPG since July 3 2018, is 31.6 (according to the app I use)........
No one can complain about that.
 

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See, the way i see it...if you bought a Cherokee and DON'T care about mpg...you bought the wrong vehicle. Tell me where you can beat the Cherokee mpg with a decent 4x4 system and towing capacity of 4500lb.
EXACTLY! What vehicle out there matches the MPG per Fun Ratio??

I care about MPG for a different reason. I track every gallon and every mile in all of my vehicles and have been doing so as long as I can remember. I look for trends. I'm a retired engineer, so I can't help myself in setting up control limits based on standard deviation and monitoring for change. OK, geek for sure. However, I can't count the times I saw the mileage start to trend down and it turned out to be something that needed attention. Filter changes (air filter really matters on a big diesel), dragging brakes, bad wheel bearings, and leaking manifolds are just a few things I found because I saw the trend going the wrong way.

Usually, I just start to poke around to find things. I found on an older vehicle that I had dragging brakes. No sound, no squeal, just noticed the wheels were hard to turn when jacked off the ground. Fixed the brakes, MPG went up. Not much, but noticeable. The leaking manifold on my RAM Hemi is another good example. I didn't relate the dropping MPG to the slight ticking when the engine was cold, but fixing the manifolds made about 1.5 MPG difference! That's significant for sure.

If you keep your vehicles for very long, MPG can give some helpful hints that something is about to go wrong (or, more precisely, something already has).

IMHO, it's not the actual MPG that matters as much as what is happening with MPG over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
... I look for trends.....IMHO, it's not the actual MPG that matters as much as what is happening with MPG over time.
I do exactly the same. I don't keep a spreadsheet or log, I just know what the last tankful's were so I know if there's any downward or unexplained trend. I don't get excited when the computer on the vehicle shows a higher than average mileage. Have you noticed whether the on-board computer is similar to your calculations?
 

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EXACTLY! What vehicle out there matches the MPG per Fun Ratio??



I care about MPG for a different reason. I track every gallon and every mile in all of my vehicles and have been doing so as long as I can remember. I look for trends. I'm a retired engineer, so I can't help myself in setting up control limits based on standard deviation and monitoring for change. OK, geek for sure. However, I can't count the times I saw the mileage start to trend down and it turned out to be something that needed attention. Filter changes (air filter really matters on a big diesel), dragging brakes, bad wheel bearings, and leaking manifolds are just a few things I found because I saw the trend going the wrong way.



Usually, I just start to poke around to find things. I found on an older vehicle that I had dragging brakes. No sound, no squeal, just noticed the wheels were hard to turn when jacked off the ground. Fixed the brakes, MPG went up. Not much, but noticeable. The leaking manifold on my RAM Hemi is another good example. I didn't relate the dropping MPG to the slight ticking when the engine was cold, but fixing the manifolds made about 1.5 MPG difference! That's significant for sure.



If you keep your vehicles for very long, MPG can give some helpful hints that something is about to go wrong (or, more precisely, something already has).



IMHO, it's not the actual MPG that matters as much as what is happening with MPG over time.


Well if you really want to stay on top of things you would have to be a theoretical physicist. I’m just going by what my friend Dr. Sheldon Cooper does for a living. If we could get him to join this group all our problems would be solved.


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I do exactly the same. I don't keep a spreadsheet or log, I just know what the last tankful's were so I know if there's any downward or unexplained trend. I don't get excited when the computer on the vehicle shows a higher than average mileage. Have you noticed whether the on-board computer is similar to your calculations?
I've found the vehicle MPG can be easily gamed. If you stomp on it for the first 1/2 tank, then baby it for the next 1/4 or so, you'll get really good mileage on your EVIC, but it will be quite bad for real. The same goes the other way - baby it for 1/2 tank, then get on it until you fill up, the EVIC will read a bit low. That's resetting the MPG at every fillup. Over time it might average out a bit closer.

On average, without playing games, my EVIC reads about 2.5 MPG better than reality. That's with a 2.1 MPG for SD. That means ~85% (or more) of the EVIC readings are too high. That's a wide variance, so really all I can say is the EVIC is optimistic. ...by a lot. So when I see someone post a 30+ MPG EVIC snapshot, I just smile.
 
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Well if you really want to stay on top of things you would have to be a theoretical physicist. I’m just going by what my friend Dr. Sheldon Cooper does for a living. If we could get him to join this group all our problems would be solved.


2019 Trailhawk Elite
Build date April 2019
I'm not enough of a geek to know what that meant, so I looked it up. OK. Now I get it. Sort of. I never watched the show. You win the nerd part of this contest. :nerd:

There is no theoretical physics involved with plotting few numbers. The "standard deviation" thing is just a quick way to look for a statistical variance - it's not required for the average Joe. It's enough to see that the MPG looks to be a bit less this month than it did last month and wonder why that might be. Just writing down what the EVIC says your MPG is at every fill-up would be sufficient.

Mr. Cooper would be bored, I presume. :wink:
 

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I suppose wanting great fuel economy while also wanting great off-roading capability is just too darn difficult to achieve. **** me, right?

In all seriousness though, I don't have many qualms about the V6 in my TH, given its capabilities with off-road, on-road, and towing. But, I suppose it would've been nice to offer the diesel that is currently offered in other markets in the US, but alas, it'll probably never happen. Just because it's a "Jeep" doesn't mean I should have to sacrifice. Models like the Grand Cherokee currently offer comparable off-road capabilities to a Ranger Rover for a cheaper price, as well as having a diesel engine option, so it is clearly possible for Jeep to bring a best of both worlds situation.

But, I should point something that is crucial though with fuel economy, and that is cost to run. How much does your car cost per year to fill up? I've seen some vehicles which do provide greater fuel economy over my TH (using EPA estimates here), but because it might use Premium gas, or even diesel, it offsets the fuel economy advantages you get. Going to the EPA's website gives you a great insight to what the operational costs are for your vehicle.

Truth be told, I can't wait for the Jeep Hybrids, and eventual EVs to start entering Jeep dealerships.
 

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Very happy with the mileage with my 18 KL 3.2 V6, it gets almost twice the mileage of my previous 96 ZJ 5.2 V8.
 
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