2014+ Jeep Cherokee Forums banner
21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Short answer : it depends. I think you have enough info here to make an educated decision.
Glad to see you didn't make a definitive answer. ;)

No doubt it's currently the best battery available, but at a very basic cost level analysis, if I can get a $165 battery with free 3 year replacement that works out to $4.58 a month for 36 months. Meanwhile an X2 at $270 with a 5 year warranty is basically the same at $4.50 a month.

I've never paid more than $170 tops for a battery in my fairly old life. So if I'm going to spend $270 on a battery it better last a hellva long time and occasionally make me breakfast in the morning. haha
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mark_

·
Registered
Blackbird 2019_Limited_4x4 Blk_on_Blk Tech_Lux_Nav
Joined
·
1,289 Posts
LOL, avoiding the hassle of dealing with a dead battery for 2 extra years is priceless! :cool:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Flybynightcru

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,682 Posts
Glad to see you didn't make a definitive answer. ;)

No doubt it's currently the best battery available, but at a very basic cost level analysis, if I can get a $165 battery with free 3 year replacement that works out to $4.58 a month for 36 months. Meanwhile an X2 at $270 with a 5 year warranty is basically the same at $4.50 a month.

I've never paid more than $170 tops for a battery in my fairly old life. So if I'm going to spend $270 on a battery it better last a hellva long time and occasionally make me breakfast in the morning. haha
It'll be interesting to see when the first Northstar / X2 Power batteries - in KLs - begin to fail... We can skip 2014 model year because there was no ESS and the book says to use wet batteries. The first 2015s are almost 7 years old now, so a rough average would probably suggest all are on the second or third year of a replacement battery. So that means we're not even close to seeing dead Northstars, haha. Or... folks just won't have their KL anymore when the premium AGM dies..
 

·
Registered
2019 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite
Joined
·
369 Posts
It'll be interesting to see when the first Northstar / X2 Power batteries - in KLs - begin to fail... We can skip 2014 model year because there was no ESS and the book says to use wet batteries. The first 2015s are almost 7 years old now, so a rough average would probably suggest all are on the second or third year of a replacement battery. So that means we're not even close to seeing dead Northstars, haha. Or... folks just won't have their KL anymore when the premium AGM dies..
The ESS isn't what kills them, its the heat and vibrations. People who don't use ESS, still have theirs day about 6 months after the people who replace them when their ESS stops working due to charging. I think @Tyler-98-W68 has 5+ years in the KL, on one that he swapped into his KL, but I could be remembering that wrong.

This is from Odyssey Batteries website. It gives a good explanation. Additionally, the Intake Air Temperature on my KL peaks at 140 degrees. If I drive it and park it for a few minutes, when I come back, the gauge will be maxed at 140 degrees for a while before the temperature comes down enough to start registering.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,682 Posts
The ESS isn't what kills them, its the heat and vibrations. People who don't use ESS, still have theirs day about 6 months after the people who replace them when their ESS stops working due to charging. I think @Tyler-98-W68 has 5+ years in the KL, on one that he swapped into his KL, but I could be remembering that wrong.

This is from Odyssey Batteries website. It gives a good explanation. Additionally, the Intake Air Temperature on my KL peaks at 140 degrees. If I drive it and park it for a few minutes, when I come back, the gauge will be maxed at 140 degrees for a while before the temperature comes down enough to start registering.

That's a good article.

Yeah the problems with the lead-calcium AGMs in a KL are multiple. ESS should not be a significant factor in battery life, but when cost cutting becomes more important than performance... we experience the consequences. We did not get a battery up to the task here. Not only is battery construction questionnable, the underhood location means heat will shorten its life in a big way (AZ for example). Had they gone TPPL ($$), we wouldn't be having these conversations and many would be using ESS more.

With the lead-calcium AGMs, ESS is a factor in battery life simply because it exacerbates their basic flaws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
The ESS isn't what kills them, its the heat and vibrations. People who don't use ESS, still have theirs day about 6 months after the people who replace them when their ESS stops working due to charging.
With the assumption that 'day' means 'die', where are you getting that data? That non ESS users batteries die 6 months later than an ESS users battery?

From this forum alone, I have no idea how many ESS vs Non-ESS users there are. Most of the people posting about their battery issues also bring up the fact that the ESS system isn't working, which tells me that they are indeed using ESS. In fact, I can't recall ever reading a post from someone saying.."I've never used ESS and my battery died after 2 years." I'm not saying that has never happened, but I haven't seen any posts on this forum on it.

There is no doubt that heat is a battery killer and the users location must be taken into account when we start talking about battery life spans. But the mere fact that we talk about needing a heavy duty 'deep cycle' battery for our KLs should tell us something about the ESS system's demands on the battery. Prior to ESS the last thing anyone ever worried about with a car battery was whether it could handle 'deep cycles'. Deep cycle batteries were needed for trolling motors, golf carts, etc. not car batteries.

In my opinion, with the advent of ESS systems we are just now starting to see the limits of normal lead calcium AGMs. Combine this with our heavily computerized car systems with their constant battery drain, and you have a recipe for shorter battery life spans and the thus the need for more robust batteries like the X2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,682 Posts
2014 KL owners have reported shorter battery life too, whether it's a V6 (no ESS) or the 2.4L. But we don't have solid data on this. Not to mention that V6 2014s have wet batteries which, 'in theory', are supposed to be more susceptible to heat than AGM batteries. That said, the equation is complex. Is ESS a factor ? Yep, even though it shouldn't be, had the engineers gone ahead with a more capable battery from the start. So anecdotally, 2015+ V6 batteries die sooner than 2014 V6 batteries, which implies ESS is at play.

Oh and I would be curious to know if... the lead-calcium AGMs do better in high heat compared to similar size wet batteries. I'm not sure they do. Premium TPPL AGMs though ? Yeah... better, by design.
 

·
Registered
2019 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite
Joined
·
369 Posts
With the assumption that 'day' means 'die', where are you getting that data? That non ESS users batteries die 6 months later than an ESS users battery?

From this forum alone, I have no idea how many ESS vs Non-ESS users there are. Most of the people posting about their battery issues also bring up the fact that the ESS system isn't working, which tells me that they are indeed using ESS. In fact, I can't recall ever reading a post from someone saying.."I've never used ESS and my battery died after 2 years." I'm not saying that has never happened, but I haven't seen any posts on this forum on it.

There is no doubt that heat is a battery killer and the users location must be taken into account when we start talking about battery life spans. But the mere fact that we talk about needing a heavy duty 'deep cycle' battery for our KLs should tell us something about the ESS system's demands on the battery. Prior to ESS the last thing anyone ever worried about with a car battery was whether it could handle 'deep cycles'. Deep cycle batteries were needed for trolling motors, golf carts, etc. not car batteries.

In my opinion, with the advent of ESS systems we are just now starting to see the limits of normal lead calcium AGMs. Combine this with our heavily computerized car systems with their constant battery drain, and you have a recipe for shorter battery life spans and the thus the need for more robust batteries like the X2.
Just my observation from multiple forums. Starting mid last year, people in the 2019s started complaining about their ESS not working (myself included). Over the past few months, I have started seeing a lot more 2019s say they won't start. Now, the 2020s have just started to complain about their ESS not working, and the 2019s are complaining about them dying, or they have having unexplained electrical issues that end up being fixed when they change the battery. Most of the ones I have asked if their ESS was working when before it died, have said it hasn't worked for several months. I have yet to see someone say they didn't use ESS and now their battery lasted 5 years (which we all know they would brag about on how ESS is killing batteries).

I live in Florida, so we are very aware of what heat does to a battery, especially newer cars. Not necessarily because of the electric demand, but in the way the engines are designed. They are designed to heat up quickly, and retain as much heat as possible (which is then cooled by the radiator.) For example, in the 2L, the exhaust manifold is water cooled. So all that heat is then blown back over the engine. They added the cloth around the battery to try to limit the heat, but that really won't do much. You also see car manufactory moving the battery into the trunk, or under the seat. An AGM or lead acid batteries used for solar can easily double the life of one in a car, and those are cycled much more frequently; however, they are not exposed to the heat of an engine compartment. The article doesn't say that a premium battery is needed, its just designed for twice the life. The only part of ESS that uses much energy is the starter. However, you are also not running the electric fans as much if not idling, and are saving that energy. If it weren't for the heat, you could use a LiFePO4 battery and never have to worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,362 Posts
If you plan on holding on to the Jeep for 2 more years+, then definitely!
my 2014 OEM battery didn't need replacing until 2019
 

·
Registered
2019 Trailhawk Elite 2.0T Olive Green Metallic Pearlcoat
Joined
·
4,574 Posts
Non ESS user here, and my original battery lasted 14 months. Likely just a fluke, and was replaced under warranty. That one has been holding its own, and the ESS does work, when I forget to push the button, but I'm also driving it much more since my partial retirement. When I didn't drive it regularly, even the current battery wouldn't sustain ESS, unless I drove it farther than around town. I sure liked that, and it wouldn't hurt my feelings, and I wouldn't rush out to fix it if the ESS quit working. I just find it annoying as hell...😎
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,682 Posts
Mine just needed to be jumped at 26000 miles. Daily driven. Has anyone been able to save the AGM with a long charge after this happens.
Hi and welcome :)

There's no quick answer here, because it depends on how much damage the battery has sustained over its life. Low charges can be 'reversed' for a while, but as they pile up, so does damage (corrosion on the plates) and battery health just goes South gradually.

Get it load tested for free at an aouto parts store and ask for the full results. Come back and share here, we'll be able to somewhat assess battery life so you know what to expect in the short term.

We've seen problems with some 2019s... battery related.

Hot climate ? Short drives ?
 

·
FCA Customer Support Group
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
This am, I attempted to remote start my 2019 TH, with no success. I then went down to manually start it, and the same thing. All lights are lighting up, and battery seems strong. I’m not hearing clicking, but maybe a faint sound of when it initially tries to turn over. I’m thinking starter or solenoid? Gonna go home and undo the battery etc, but I don’t think that’s the issue. Just passed 38,000 miles. Any help is appreciated.
Hi calz,
If you decide to have your vehicle diagnosed by your local dealer and want some additional assistance, feel free to send us a PM. We'd be happy to help.

Sarah
Jeep Cares
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top