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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
That video simply had the operator not knowing how to use the features and traction control system on this vehicle he was driving.
Is there any documentation, manual or whatsoever to know which mode should be used on some particular pavement?

why i'm asking - there are a lot of video when Cherokee just stopped on a sleep where it's steep on not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The clutches in the RDM will overheat before the transmission, frequently happens if you are wheeling hard in 4-high. 4-low solves the problem as the clutch packs in the RDM are locked so minimal slipping
Do you suggest using 4low when driving in relatively hard condition not to avoid overheating of RDM?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Any selec terrain mode can be used in 4-high, even on drive pavement.

If i'm offroad and driving hard, I use 4-low, keeps the trans cooler and the RDM cooler
Have you ever bumped into this behavior when it's stuck on any pavement?
 

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Have you ever bumped into this behavior when it's stuck on any pavement?
If you're stuck on pavement, you probably have bigger problems...
 

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this is another video describes what i meant.
That video highlights perfectly why LOW RANGE is essential for any type of offroading. It wasn't that challenging of terrain but the brake lock differential programming overcomes the limited amount of torque available in 4-high.
 

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this is another video describes what i meant.
So, I think I have a solution to your issue: Keep decent rubber on the Cherokee!
The shut down is letting you know you are doing something wrong.
Why would you just want to wallow like a noob on the beach, and dig yourself in deeper?
Even my old Blazer (1999) and my old Explorer (2009) would have issues with bad tires!
 

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I've never had that issue. I've driven in plenty deep snow up steep hills even my driveway which is steep with 2 or more feet of snow on the ground. I've driven offroad not had this issue.

If your having this issue in 4 low either you need some tutorials or your tires probably need new rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I've never had that issue. I've driven in plenty deep snow up steep hills even my driveway which is steep with 2 or more feet of snow on the ground. I've driven offroad not had this issue.

If your having this issue in 4 low either you need some tutorials or your tires probably need new rubber.
Currently i'm trying to find out which pattern (how much torque is passed to rear or forward axle) is used for which mode.
 

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Currently i'm trying to find out which pattern (how much torque is passed to rear or forward axle) is used for which mode.


TLDR EVERY mode sends up to 50% torque to the rear
 

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So, I think I have a solution to your issue: Keep decent rubber on the Cherokee!
The shut down is letting you know you are doing something wrong.
Why would you just want to wallow like a noob on the beach, and dig yourself in deeper?
Even my old Blazer (1999) and my old Explorer (2009) would have issues with bad tires!
I find myself disagreeing with everything you said (other than obviously always have good tires). :)

I've experienced this exact thing myself, with brand spanking new AT tires - literally a few hundred miles old. So the tires are not at fault in this situation, in my opinion, regardless of what the guy in the video says.

I disagree the shutdown is there to let you know you're doing anything "wrong". This vehicle, with this engine, should be able to walk up the hill in 4-hi no problem was it not for all the electronic nannies and a gearbox that is perhaps a bit on a short side in regard to torque limits. My old WJ with Quadra-Drive would have done it all day, all night, and the next day too without breaking a sweat. Though you'd have to stop to refill it a couple of times or five...

In this kind of terrain I see no issue, technique wise, managing the climb using primarily the right foot. A bit of momentum helps a lot in a lot of situations. Obviously, once the wheels start spinning rather than just slipping a bit it's time to regroup and go into 4-low.

Clearly the KL have to be driven differently but even so, for this incline it really shouldn't be necessary. And in my experience so far it seems TC off or snow mode goes at least some way to allow you get up without having to go low. Of course, if it's very steep you stop and shift into low. And if it's a long incline, or a terrain where you have to go slow, 4-low is the right answer too. Not least to keep the temperatures down as Tyler points out.

Aside from having to stop and wait an eternity for the hi-lo and lo-hi shift to complete before continuing, I try to shift back and forth as little as I possibly can. The system with actuators and a million sensors talking to a dozen computers, and whatnot else just seems so darn fragile, and I'd much rather be stuck somewhere in boonies in 4-hi than in 4-lo. Maybe the system is more robust than I give it credit for, but it sure doesn't inspire me with the same confidence as a lever that shifts with a solid "clunck!".
 
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I have to agree with @KL14. Here's my experience:

I never had a situation with the TH/E with the 2.0L Turbo where it was all engine and no go. Steep inclines may stop the vehicle but so far haven't stopped the wheels from turning.

I'll use 4-lo for certain circumstances.

1. Long accents. 4-lo keeps things from overheating.
2. Steep accents. 4-lo and lock (Trailhawk) keeps things moving forward.
3. Steep descents. 4-lo has much better engine braking and keeps things under control.

Snow mode? Sure. When in soft and sketchy circumstances. Helps that things start out in 2nd and keeps wheels from spinning.
Sport mode? Only when I'm feeling the love. ...or when I'm tired of the lag in Auto mode. But not off-road.
Sand/Mud mode? Really haven't found a good use for it yet. Personal preference.
Rock mode? Eh. 4-lo already. Might as well put it in Lock and climb without drama.

Never, NEVER had a situation where the engine is whining and no motion from wheels not turning. Maybe the 2.0L Turbo is different from the 3.2 in that regard?

...and yes - good tires make a lot of difference. But that would be a lot of spinning without going anywhere, not a lot of engine RPM and no wheel motion.

I guess I'll have to push the limits even harder (wife permitting) to see if I can get into a situation where the engine is willing but the drive train won't respond. I've already pretty much ticked off the wife on the trails I've taken, so I'll need to really push the limits!

As a reference, I also have a JK Rubicon on 37's that has seen far more super-tough trails than the KL has seen (or ever will). We have been 4-wheeling for longer than I care to admit. The wife has a good calibration of what is "rough" vs "tough". Moab and Phoenix have many trails in the "tough" and "super tough" categories, for sure. I have ventured into the fringes of "tough" with the KL. That's the wife-limit threshold I'll need to try to exceed. :)
 

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The brake lock differential system will overwhelm the vehicle on a steep incline regardless of engine if the vehicle isn't in 4-low. It happens on any vehicle that doesn't have 4-low or isn't in 4-low.

Example


Note the struggle in 4-high, ZERO issues in 4-low


In 4-high = issues

Now in 4-low



So if you want to take engine power in to account. Why is it that a vehicle with 390ft/lbs (5.7 WK2) exhibits the exact same behavior when its not in 4-low


It's not about engine torque it's about torque multiplication when using 4-low which can overcome the brake lock differential system.

It has nothing to do with engine choice and everything to do with gearing.

Why is it that no one with 2.4 TH's complain about lack of power when they are off road? It's because of the 56:1 Crawl ratio.
 
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