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Discussion Starter #1
I'm playing around with the idea of drilling a hole in my sliders and using them as air tanks for my tires. I bought the RRO super sliders and I don't know if the round tube and the square tube are one volume or two separate volumes. I would hope I could hold a decent amount of air.
 

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I'm playing around with the idea of drilling a hole in my sliders and using them as air tanks for my tires. I bought the RRO super sliders and I don't know if the round tube and the square tube are one volume or two separate volumes. I would hope I could hold a decent amount of air.
Now that's the infamous Sqenixs Laboratory I know!!! The Professor is back, always thinking outside the box!!! Make it happen brother, although, I'm not sure there would be enough air to air up all four tires, but hey, you don't know until you try...
Edison's Medicine!!!馃
 

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ingenious....and here I just bought a viair compressor. 馃榿
 

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This idea has been around since at least the 80's. There are pros and mostly cons.

Pro: Compressed air available when you need it. If filled with CO2, there is even more volume to air up after an adventure.
Pro: Weight of air = nothing. Weight of existing fixture already factored in.

Con: Internal rust. Compressing air usually means compressing the humidity in the air too. Need to drain often (every trip?). Even then expect internal rust.
Con: Welds on anything not intending to be pressurized are not done by a certified boilermaker (welder, not drink). No telling if whatever you are using will even hold air.
Con: The chances of your bung blowing out (the one you add to get air in and out) are really good unless you have excellent welding skills or have access to a boilermaker.
Con: BOOM! Compressed air can be violent if released quickly, like in an accident. Don't think it happened too often in real life, but the danger is there.
Con: To mitigate BOOM!, need to keep pressures below 80 lbs or so, limiting usefulness.
Con: Repeated pressure/depressure causes stress on flat surfaces, like end caps. Metal can deform over time and eventually welds will leak even if done by a boilermaker.
Con: Metal needs to be about 1/4" thick. Don't think that's too common in rock rails (some, yes).
Con: A rock rail really isn't that many cubic feet of volume. You can estimate the volume of your tire and the PSI difference you need to fill them (say, from 20 PSI to 36 PSI). Times 4 of course. Then you'll need to figure the cubic feet in your rails (or bumper, whatever) and the PSI needed to fill your tires. I didn't do the math, but I'm sure PSI is going to be crazy high.

I've seen many hard-core Jeepers with compressed air (or even water) in their bumpers, though I haven't noticed any in their rock rails. Heck, AEV even makes a bumper for the Wrangler that is designed to hold water.

I've considered this myself for my JK but decided there are just too many cons. Filling a tire directly usually takes a100% duty cycle compressor I thought that by adding volume it could help reduce the duty cycle of a compressor. That works by having a smaller volume to fill until the compressor stops, then transferring that volume to the tires while the compressor rests. Takes longer, but it reduces the wear and tear on the compressor - assuming you let it cool long enough. But my compressors (all of them) are 100% duty cycle anyway, so nothing really gained.
 
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Eyeballing it with no math to back it up, the difference in volume between the tires and relatively small volume of the rock rails means you would need extremely high pressure to get any sort of practical benefit.

Storing extremely high pressure inside something that's literally designed to get hit by things is a bad idea.

I just keep a small little 12v air pump with the spare tire. It's certainly not the fastest thing in the world, but I'm not airing up/down tires very often either.

Keeping accidents in mind, it's probably wiser to haul around an on-board compressor rather than a pressurized tank if you're just using it for tires. Compressed gas has weight to it, so it's really not much of a weight savings to avoid a compressor. And compressors don't run out or spring a leak that you don't know is there until you need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm no chemist but could compressed CO2 generate carbonic acid inside the rails? That is very bad for steel. Otherwise I am not too concerned about rusting. I also already have a CO2 tank and could fill up the rails using that since no place that fills tanks would touch something like this. I carry it with me when offroading and it holds enough CO2 (2.5lbs) to do all 5 of my tires from 0 up to 36psi.

The real question is how much pressure can the rails hold, and how good are they welded? I don't know the answer to that.
 

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I'm no chemist but could compressed CO2 generate carbonic acid inside the rails? That is very bad for steel. Otherwise I am not too concerned about rusting. I also already have a CO2 tank and could fill up the rails using that since no place that fills tanks would touch something like this. I carry it with me when offroading and it holds enough CO2 (2.5lbs) to do all 5 of my tires from 0 up to 36psi.

The real question is how much pressure can the rails hold, and how good are they welded? I don't know the answer to that.
The CO2 will form carbonic acid in the presence of any moisture, I'm a power engineer and operate boilers, the main cause of corrosion in condensate return systems is inadequate chemical treatment to combat carbonic acid corrosion. As to the other issues of pressurizing something that isn't designed to hold pressure and is designed to be hit on a regular basis, I would say listen to the other guys and just use a compressor, besides the fact that you'd never get enough gas in the rails to be any use....
 
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