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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been following all the AlphOBD forums on the RAM forum as I have a 2019 3500 HD. Have the security cable and all the devices/software and made some changes such as fog lamp dropout changes. I would like to make some changes to our 2018 Jeep Cherokee but are confused by some car model choices.

First, not sure if the 2018 requires the same security bypass as the 2019's and up. Secondly, when selecting the car model in Alpha OBD, I am confused by the KL, KJ, KK choices. One of the selections is "Cherokee (KL) MY2014>" and thought that to be the one I need to select. Two others are "Liberty/Cherokee (KJ)" and "Liberty/Cherokee (KK)."

Would greatly appreciate some advice. What selection would I make to connect to the BCM and again do I need to defeat the security as in the 2019's and up?

Thanks,
ram5thwheel
 

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The "Liberty/Cherokee (KJ)" and "Liberty/Cherokee (KK)." are the Liberty in North America and Cherokee in other parts of the world. The Cherokee name did not die elsewhere as it did here.
Use KL ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What was your solution to the security bypass? In my RAM, I purchased the appropriate cable from KaodTech. (I did send him an email asking about a cable for the Jeep.) I have seen references to the location of the CAN block connectors but will research further. I have the one in my RAM just tied out of the way for easy use when I need to make a change.
Thanks for any additional help or suggestions in this regards.
 

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I have been looking into this as well. I recently came from a ford, and they had a similar product called forscan. I also have the security gateway module as I have a 2019. I found this post in my research. I still haven't taken the plunge due to the fact I need a new OBD2 plug as well as the bypass module, and don't really want to drop $150 on it right now.
I found out recently about this new security feature making programming the vehicle basically impossible without bypassing. I have seen some people on here suggest the bypass module like the one here, however that requires taking out the stereo and plugging in/unplugging every time in the case where I end up taking the vehicle to the dealer. I found this link here that seems to talk about ways to bypass the security gateway but I'm unsure which one is easiest to do. I would want to add a permanent solution that doesn't require me to constantly add/remove and that will work through the OBD II port. I also read that snap-on now has a tool that works properly, but it is expensive for the tool and costs $50 a year for the registration to get through the security gateway.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the link on your research. I will check it out. I purchased everything, as I mentioned, for my RAM so only need the security solution for the Jeep. Will post on my solution.,
ram5thwheel
 

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I'm sure I will go down that road eventually.
 

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If you are interested, here's a nice little introduction to what the Jeep letters mean:


It's not complete. For example, this particular list neglects to mention that the KJ/KK is "Liberty" in North America and "Cherokee" everywhere else. If anyone knows of a complete list with all of the nuances, please pass it on!

There's a few good threads on this forum on how to bypass the security module, like this one:

 

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Unless AlfaOBD has gotten better in the last 6 months it can't proxy align to all the modules in the car. So after making changes your car will be messed up. I found this out the hard way. Based on the logs from when I did it the following failed to proxy align (at a minimum):

  • ECM/PCM
  • electronic power steering (EPS)
  • anti-lock brakes (ABS)
  • transmission control module (TCM)
  • electronic parking brake (EPB)
  • driver assist system module (DASM)
  • drivetrain control module (DTCM)

So as long as you are just reading data or running tests and not changing things alfaobd is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is interesting. I made an attempt to read the data "Car Configuration" from the BCM and it only gave me an abbreviated log as to VIN, make of module and other stuff but never provided me the configuration data. In my RAM, I can get an entire log of current configurations.
I was able to get a fairly lengthy log on module status but that was it. Thought it may be because of the lack of the security bypass.
AlphaOBD does not respond like it does in the RAM.
 

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Unless AlfaOBD has gotten better in the last 6 months it can't proxy align to all the modules in the car. So after making changes your car will be messed up. I found this out the hard way. Based on the logs from when I did it the following failed to proxy align (at a minimum):

  • ECM/PCM
  • electronic power steering (EPS)
  • anti-lock brakes (ABS)
  • transmission control module (TCM)
  • electronic parking brake (EPB)
  • driver assist system module (DASM)
  • drivetrain control module (DTCM)

So as long as you are just reading data or running tests and not changing things alfaobd is fine.
I ran into this on my 2015 TH. My goal was to change the fog light dropout when the high beams are on. I have about the cheapest OBD2 adapter that there is. It's a translucent blue plastic ELM327 bluetooth OBD2 reader that I got on Amazon for about $10 years ago. AlfaOBD seems to work well with it, so I changed the setting and it worked, but then my Jeep odometer started blinking. I found out that this is due to needing to complete the proxi alignment. After performing the proxi align, my phone running AlfaOBD indicated that I needed to plug in the "blue" adapter to complete the proxi align. After looking THAT up, I discovered that in fact there are several adapters that simply swaps a couple pins on the OBD2 connector. The blue adapter connects the Jeeps SECOND communication bus to the OBD2 adapters only communication bus pins. So for $10, I order a simple 16-wire, 1' long OBD2 extension cable from the Amazon

Specifically, I cut the wires for pins 6 and 14 (CAN High Speed) and pins 3 and 11 (CAN Medium Speed).
I splice pin 3 on the male end that plugs into the Jeep over to pin 6 on the female end that my ELM327 plugs into.
I splice pin 14 on the male end that plugs into the Jeep over to pin 11 on the female end that my ELM327 plugs into.
Just leave the remaining 4 cut wires taped off and not touching anything and leave all of the other 12 wires connected as they were.

I then redid the proxi alignment and this time when it prompted me to install the blue adapter, I unplugged my ELM327 OBD2 adapter, plugged in my hacked up extension cable, and plugged the ELM327 into that. AlfaOBD then took off and finished the proxi align. Then you shut the Jeep ignition off and have to wait for the system to actually shut down, which takes some time. I'm not sure exactly how long, but it's under 30 minutes. When I came back 30 minutes later and turned the ignition back on, the blinking odometer was gone!

No more errors!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My goal is to also disable the dropout for the fog lamps. With our 2018 Jeep Cherokee, you have the added necessity of bypassing the SGM. I am wondering if after the bypass, the wiring crossover (emulating the blue module) is required to complete the proxy align?
On the RAM forums, the level of detail with regards to enabling/disabling different functions is extensive. Certain functions have been tested and added to a growing list of known good hacks. Would be nice if we could get a forum for the Jeep. Starting with bypassing the SGM and screenshots of various configuration changes. Just wishing!
 

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I ran into this on my 2015 TH. My goal was to change the fog light dropout when the high beams are on. I have about the cheapest OBD2 adapter that there is. It's a translucent blue plastic ELM327 bluetooth OBD2 reader that I got on Amazon for about $10 years ago. AlfaOBD seems to work well with it, so I changed the setting and it worked, but then my Jeep odometer started blinking. I found out that this is due to needing to complete the proxi alignment. After performing the proxi align, my phone running AlfaOBD indicated that I needed to plug in the "blue" adapter to complete the proxi align. After looking THAT up, I discovered that in fact there are several adapters that simply swaps a couple pins on the OBD2 connector. The blue adapter connects the Jeeps SECOND communication bus to the OBD2 adapters only communication bus pins. So for $10, I order a simple 16-wire, 1' long OBD2 extension cable from the Amazon

Specifically, I cut the wires for pins 6 and 14 (CAN High Speed) and pins 3 and 11 (CAN Medium Speed).
I splice pin 3 on the male end that plugs into the Jeep over to pin 6 on the female end that my ELM327 plugs into.
I splice pin 14 on the male end that plugs into the Jeep over to pin 11 on the female end that my ELM327 plugs into.
Just leave the remaining 4 cut wires taped off and not touching anything and leave all of the other 12 wires connected as they were.

I then redid the proxi alignment and this time when it prompted me to install the blue adapter, I unplugged my ELM327 OBD2 adapter, plugged in my hacked up extension cable, and plugged the ELM327 into that. AlfaOBD then took off and finished the proxi align. Then you shut the Jeep ignition off and have to wait for the system to actually shut down, which takes some time. I'm not sure exactly how long, but it's under 30 minutes. When I came back 30 minutes later and turned the ignition back on, the blinking odometer was gone!

No more errors!
I had a custom wiring harness made that plugged straight into the high and regular canbus junction under the center console, bypassing the security gateway. So I don't think that what you did applies to the newer cherokee, or at least not in my case. I still think alfa OBD doesn't properly communicate with all the modules in the vehicle.
 
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Hi, I am trying to update a DAB setting on my Jeep Cherokee KL I have updated the setting but when performing a Proxy Alignment using AlphaOBD it starts and runs for a while and performs some of the proxy alignment then pops up a message box saying "Check Interface", I have tried a number of times but each time come up with the same message. I tried changing the timeout to longer but still get the issue. Has anyone had this issue and been able to fix and perform a Proxy Alignment?

Thanks

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Most scanners do not read the special pins the Stellantis (Fiat-Chrysler) vehicles use for certain busses (see below). I cannot say as to whether the Jaycar reader will read at the speeds needed but I did find this, so you may good on that: Supported and Not Supported OBD Adapters – JScan
What the Blue Adaptor does is switch the pins that the reader is seeing (some Jeeps need a "Grey Adapter" as well, for some modules, but haven't heard that the Cherokee needs it)

From AlfaOBD (https://www.alfaobd.com/AlfaOBD_Android_Help.pdf) :

ELM327-based Bluetooth/USB/ WLAN interface. There are many suppliers of such interfaces, make sure the version is 1.3 and above. The interface supports all CAN and most of the K-Line units. A rule of thumb is that the K-Line units with connection baud rate less than 10400 bps is not supported. Because the quality of ELM327 clones is not stable, it is recommended to use tested interfaces (see www.alfaobd.com for details).

By default OBDKey and ELM327 interfaces have pins 6 and 14 connected to CAN lines so they should work with most of CAN units “out of the box”. But if you have a car with the B-CAN lines connected to pins 1 and 9 or 3 and 11 you will have to modify your interface correspondingly. Alternatively, get a “Yellow” (for pins 1 and 9) or “Blue” (for pins 3 and 11) adapter from http://electronicfuchs.de/shop/category_12/Adapter.html?shop_param=cid=& (both yellow and blue adapters) or Additional system adaptor extension cables for MultiECUScan diagnostic software (yellow adapter only)
 

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So... I think I'm ready to take the leap on this alfaobd adventure. It appears that learning this tool can save a jeep owner many unwanted trips to the dealer. As a fairly old school mechanic, how excited am I to see another system In a car with a whole plethora of new things to go wrong? Oh well, gotta keep up with the times. I specifically want to mate my android aftermarket stereo controls to my climate zone controls for my first project. What I would really appreciate is a quick list of what I need to purchase to be successful on my first try. After reading multiple threads, I am definitely humble enough to admit that I can benefit greatly from others trial and error. I know I won't buy the right parts the first time.lol. Also, if there has been a good write up for dummies on the step by step procedures of completing a successful pairing and proxy alignment, I'm sure I'll copy it on to a 3x5 card for reference...
 
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