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At silver lake sand dunes in Michigan I started with 15psi and then when I went to around 11 psi there was a noticeable improvement. Had no bead issues. This was with nitto ridge grappler tires:

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks all for the great advice! I didn't consider that the stock tires might not handle lower pressure. I'll make sure to keep it up around 25 until I get different tires...

I've driven on that beach north of Crescent city in a stock Wrangler without airing down.... the sand was pretty soft and deep compared to Pismo. Didn't spend too much time there before heading back to pavement.
 

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Those pictures look like the beaches I have been driving on for over 30 years. Other than Race Point which is part of the national sea shore on Cape Cod and you are required to air down to a max of 12 psi I have never felt the need to air down at all. Also it has been my experience low range is not required at all and aggressive all terrain tires are a detriment, an all season road tire works well. For the most part 4wd is not needed but the real key to success driving on the beach is ground clearance. The beach nearest to my house looks like a parking lot on summer weekends and the vehicles that get stuck are ones with minimal ground clearance, they get hung up in ruts.

Dave
I had 2 extra people in the car tonight and got a little stuck trying to back around out of the ruts to park tonight. Someone in another Cherokee stopped on their way out to see if we were ok, so I asked what pressure they run and they said they always go down to 10psi. They had a basic all-season tire, looked like a 225/60, not much sidewall. I scooped a bit of sand away from the tires and dropped to 15 psi and pulled out with no further problems. 10psi seems excessively low but seems to work well for them.

So I'm pretty sure you need both 4wd and low pressure in this sand. The Falkens Wildpeaks are not an aggressive all-terrain tire, more of an aggressive all-season tire. Low range is probably not required but the Cherokee seems notorious for overheating some part of the drivetrain in challenging conditions when not in low range.
 

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I have 2 sets of the automatic deflators. 1 set takes them down 8 Lbs to 28 Lbs (washboard roads). The other set takes them down 16 Lbs to 20 Lbs. Haven't had a reason to use them yet.
 

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I had 2 extra people in the car tonight and got a little stuck trying to back around out of the ruts to park tonight. Someone in another Cherokee stopped on their way out to see if we were ok, so I asked what pressure they run and they said they always go down to 10psi. They had a basic all-season tire, looked like a 225/60, not much sidewall. I scooped a bit of sand away from the tires and dropped to 15 psi and pulled out with no further problems. 10psi seems excessively low but seems to work well for them.

So I'm pretty sure you need both 4wd and low pressure in this sand. The Falkens Wildpeaks are not an aggressive all-terrain tire, more of an aggressive all-season tire. Low range is probably not required but the Cherokee seems notorious for overheating some part of the drivetrain in challenging conditions when not in low range.
Yeah, any AWD system is going to tend to overheat in sand/loose terrain. It'll happen even in Low but it'll help. Turning on the lockers will help even more.
 

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12-13 without any problems.

The lower you go, the wider your track is, the better you'll be on sand.

I go around the same for rocks, less likely to puncture and overall more comfortable ride for passengers.

Keep in mind the Destination 2s have a rubber exterior coating that's pretty garbage. It's going to get plucked apart with even mild off roading. That's not a symptom of low pressure, as much as shitty design.
 

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12-13 without any problems.

The lower you go, the wider your track is, the better you'll be on sand.

I go around the same for rocks, less likely to puncture and overall more comfortable ride for passengers.

Keep in mind the Destination 2s have a rubber exterior coating that's pretty garbage. It's going to get plucked apart with even mild off roading. That's not a symptom of low pressure, as much as shitty design.
Nice jeep! Is that the Gobi rack?

Sent from my SM-N986U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Well... it looks like my strategy of "lift it now (MFC 2") and wait until you get some miles on the tires before switching them out" may be flawed :)
 

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Nice jeep! Is that the Gobi rack?

Sent from my SM-N986U1 using Tapatalk
Yeah, that's the Gobi stealth rack. Part of a group buy we did back in '15.

Sent from my HD1925 using Tapatalk
 

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At silver lake sand dunes in Michigan I started with 15psi and then when I went to around 11 psi there was a noticeable improvement. Had no bead issues. This was with nitto ridge grappler tires:

View attachment 215698
Did your Trailhawk come with black wheels or did you paint yours? Powder coat?

I’m thinking about plasti-dipping mine so wondering what you did here. (Sorry for thread jack, I tried to message you but I’m a new member and it won’t let me.)

On topic: I aired down for the first time (to 25psi with stock Destination ATs) and WOW what a difference it made in both comfort and ability to crawl up rocky/hilly terrain. I will try lower next time to try to damage those sidewalls enough to justify a new tire purchase/upgrade :LOL:
 

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Did your Trailhawk come with black wheels or did you paint yours? Powder coat?

I’m thinking about plasti-dipping mine so wondering what you did here. (Sorry for thread jack, I tried to message you but I’m a new member and it won’t let me.)

On topic: I aired down for the first time (to 25psi with stock Destination ATs) and WOW what a difference it made in both comfort and ability to crawl up rocky/hilly terrain. I will try lower next time to try to damage those sidewalls enough to justify a new tire purchase/upgrade :LOL:
I bought aftermarket because the wheels I wanted (the black wheels that are stock option on a 2019) were $400 a piece.


I bought these for $115 usd each plus $40 usd shipping each. The only downside is that these will get scratched really bad when offroading. I have not figured out a way to protect them that doesn't cost a lot of money or time.
 

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Here's the Falken Wildpeaks (235/60/18) at 16 psi or so, they have a noticeable sag. It looks a lot worse in person, I haven't figured out the right angle to capture how flat it looks in a photo yet.

I haven't gone any lower than this, and it works well for sand, better than the 22 psi I tried before. I definitely wouldn't go this low for hard terrain.

Tire Land vehicle Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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All depends on tires and terrain. I like 20/22 for offroading , sand would obviously be less,.
 

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I've never aired down for anything except for the sand in Pismo Beach...😎
 

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trial and error

  • one extreme - highway pressure - the car will hit obstacles w/ a jolt & it will be unpleasant for you & your back regardless of how slow you go
  • the other extreme - too soft & you will bounce a lot & that will be uncomfortable for you as well. it will force you to slow down more than you want
  • happy medium - lets you drive at the speed you want comfortably

good luck finding your sweet spots on the trails you choose(y)
 

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Throwing a curve here... Elevation changes.

Don't forget to correct for elevation change if you go from sea level to the "real" mountains or back. I'm talking 8000' or higher, not east coast mountains ;):cool:

My 38 PSI at home becomes 41 up at 9000'. Not a big deal, but if I'm then going on rocky gravel I deflate to 28 - 30 or so depending on the size of loose rocks and "babyheads."
I'll air up to "normal" 36 PSI, then check them the next morning when they're not heated up. Any cold inflation over 33 is fine with me.
When I get back to home elevation (near sea level) I'll correct by adding 3 -4 PSI for my usual home cold inflation 38.
 

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I do 20-25 for only very rough rocky trails, otherwise I'm lazy and leave it aired up. Maybe I should be sticking closer to 22-25 sounds like
 
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