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Had a Dobinsons lift installed by a local reputable shop that specializes in Wranglers, but does work on all sorts of other vehicles (centered around offroading)... They accepted the job and said it shouldn't be an issue. Only to find out afterwards they've never done a Dobinsons lift on a Cherokee before. No big deal, it looked great and they said they only ran into minor issues.

Except now I have a clunk coming from the front left, and very much sounds like a strut bearing going or messed up.

I got underneath and looked, and I could tell the strut bearing mount was rotated about 180° from where it should be (supposed to be a hole on the bearing mount that aligns with the strut tower). They said they brought it to Jeep for an alignment, and jeep must have rotated the strut bearings to adjust camber after the lift....

Now I have read some people say camber is adjustable this way. But have also read that the only way to adjust camber is sliding the cross member. And other people saying a 1.5" lift isn't going to throw camber off at all.

In my geniusness, I didn't ask for a copy of the alignment sheet. And they say they don't have it anymore.

My question is... Before I blame them for installing the strut bearing mounts incorrectly and busting up the bearing... Has anyone actually had jeep adjust camber by rotating their strut bearing mounts? Or has anyone installed Dobinsons and required any adjustments at all to alignment in the front? (Besides toe)
 

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You should do a search on "strut bearing cap". The 180 degree rotation approach is total BS.

Check out this thread for bearing cap rotations and camber adjustment.

Cherokee TH Rear Camber

I currently have Dobinsons KL struts with a 0mm offset. The bearing cap notch (NOT the hole in the tab) is aligned with the strut tower hole. My camber on 02-13-2019 was -0.7° (LF) and -0.3° (RF). The camber spec tolerance is -0.9° to -0.1°

As shown in the referenced post, the notch is at position 16. I transferred these marks to the bearing cap clip retainer ring (blue marker) for easy reference. There are circumferential position marks on the inside of the clip retainer ring; however, after replacing several LF and RF bearing caps I have seen that these marks are not consistent from cap to cap.

Driver's side (LF): going from position 16 to 14 gave camber results of 0.4° to -0.4°. Rotate bearing cap CCW (top looking down). Verify relative notch position wrt to strut tower alignment hole. Notch should be CW from hole (bottom looking up).

To get the same camber affect on the Passenger's side (RF), you would rotate in the opposite direction.

@fryguy, I don't know where you got your information (sounds like MFC) but it sounds suspect. "rotate the strut top hat 180 degree clockwise" is overkill. If you rotate 180° then it doesn't matter if you go CW or CCW. 😉 My above empirical results are for sound components. If you have a damaged bearing cap, strut, etc., then rotating the bearing cap will have no effect on camber.

Side note on "lifted" vehicles
A longer strut (i.e. Dobinsons KL) will increase the cord length from the bearing cap to the steering knuckle. Adding an offset will also increase the cord length. An increase in cord length will make the camber more positive. For example: starting with an OEM strut with 0mm offset and a measured camber of -0.4° and changing to a 23mm offset will give a camber of -0.1°. If the OEM strut is replaced with a Dobinsons KL strut (which has a built-in 25mm length), then the camber may be 0° (out of tolerance). If a 23mm offset is included, the the camber would be +0.3° (out of tolerance) and adjustment would be required to get back into tolerance.

There is a lot of discussion on this topic is several different threads. Spend some time with the search function and you'll probably find the answer to a multitude of questions.
 

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Had a Dobinsons lift installed by a local reputable shop that specializes in Wranglers, but does work on all sorts of other vehicles (centered around offroading)... They accepted the job and said it shouldn't be an issue. Only to find out afterwards they've never done a Dobinsons lift on a Cherokee before. No big deal, it looked great and they said they only ran into minor issues.

Except now I have a clunk coming from the front left, and very much sounds like a strut bearing going or messed up.

I got underneath and looked, and I could tell the strut bearing mount was rotated about 180° from where it should be (supposed to be a hole on the bearing mount that aligns with the strut tower). They said they brought it to Jeep for an alignment, and jeep must have rotated the strut bearings to adjust camber after the lift....

Now I have read some people say camber is adjustable this way. But have also read that the only way to adjust camber is sliding the cross member. And other people saying a 1.5" lift isn't going to throw camber off at all.

In my geniusness, I didn't ask for a copy of the alignment sheet. And they say they don't have it anymore.

My question is... Before I blame them for installing the strut bearing mounts incorrectly and busting up the bearing... Has anyone actually had jeep adjust camber by rotating their strut bearing mounts? Or has anyone installed Dobinsons and required any adjustments at all to alignment in the front? (Besides toe)
Hello
MFC recommends that method. Please check the link.
My TH has also been lifted up by 2 inches.
Camber this way I am adjusting.
 

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Had a Dobinsons lift installed by a local reputable shop that specializes in Wranglers, but does work on all sorts of other vehicles (centered around offroading)... They accepted the job and said it shouldn't be an issue. Only to find out afterwards they've never done a Dobinsons lift on a Cherokee before. No big deal, it looked great and they said they only ran into minor issues.

Except now I have a clunk coming from the front left, and very much sounds like a strut bearing going or messed up.

I got underneath and looked, and I could tell the strut bearing mount was rotated about 180° from where it should be (supposed to be a hole on the bearing mount that aligns with the strut tower). They said they brought it to Jeep for an alignment, and jeep must have rotated the strut bearings to adjust camber after the lift....

Now I have read some people say camber is adjustable this way. But have also read that the only way to adjust camber is sliding the cross member. And other people saying a 1.5" lift isn't going to throw camber off at all.

In my geniusness, I didn't ask for a copy of the alignment sheet. And they say they don't have it anymore.

My question is... Before I blame them for installing the strut bearing mounts incorrectly and busting up the bearing... Has anyone actually had jeep adjust camber by rotating their strut bearing mounts? Or has anyone installed Dobinsons and required any adjustments at all to alignment in the front? (Besides toe)
Had a Dobinsons lift installed by a local reputable shop that specializes in Wranglers, but does work on all sorts of other vehicles (centered around offroading)... They accepted the job and said it shouldn't be an issue. Only to find out afterwards they've never done a Dobinsons lift on a Cherokee before. No big deal, it looked great and they said they only ran into minor issues.

Except now I have a clunk coming from the front left, and very much sounds like a strut bearing going or messed up.

I got underneath and looked, and I could tell the strut bearing mount was rotated about 180° from where it should be (supposed to be a hole on the bearing mount that aligns with the strut tower). They said they brought it to Jeep for an alignment, and jeep must have rotated the strut bearings to adjust camber after the lift....

Now I have read some people say camber is adjustable this way. But have also read that the only way to adjust camber is sliding the cross member. And other people saying a 1.5" lift isn't going to throw camber off at all.

In my geniusness, I didn't ask for a copy of the alignment sheet. And they say they don't have it anymore.

My question is... Before I blame them for installing the strut bearing mounts incorrectly and busting up the bearing... Has anyone actually had jeep adjust camber by rotating their strut bearing mounts? Or has anyone installed Dobinsons and required any adjustments at all to alignment in the front? (Besides toe)
I have the Dobinson liftall around plus a half a Hazard up front ( lifted and leveled). First did the Dobinson and the alignment was all green, then added the half a Hazard and the left front just over at .1 degree positive. I pay for each alignment, expensive, so I would have done as Snowhawk recommends as it makes sense, but with one chance to get it right, I rotated the left front strut bearing 180 and took it back for another payed alignment. So now I am at -.3 degrees, good and green. So did I need to go 180, no, but it is good so there it sits.
I had a clunk in front right after I installed the first lift and it ended up being one sway bar link was not completely torqued, though it looked good and tight.
211880
 

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I recently had to replace my LH Top strut mount / bearing assy because of low speed clunking and "twanging"from the spring. Strut mount assy was only a year old from being fitted new last year - but when I got it apart I found the bearing assy hadn't been assembled correctly from manufacture.

Check out my replies to Snowhawk below for clear info.

The top metal/rubber/plastic unit that sits up in the tower and has the metal "hat" part that sticks thru the hole and the irrigation clip things lock onto is basically wedge shaped - which is how you can move the top end of the shock absorber shaft in a circle around the actual central axis and achieve alignment changes - so rotating that top part IS legit for adjusting camber (it also affects caster but that's not a significant issue).

If you have clunking - ESPECIALLY if there's sort of "twanging" thru the spring - mainly at low speed such as parking and unparking then I'd just about guarantee the bearing isn't assembled properly - as shown in pics in my following posts.

EDITED - to be more concise.
 
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Snowhawk2015 - what I'm seeing there is exactly the same kind of incorrect assembly I had - ie. ur middle picture there shows the retainer already clipped in place which SHOULD be stretched over the skirt of the other bearing half BEFORE being clipped into place as shown there... - in fact it looks like you're missing the lower half / race of that bearing all together!! - here are pictures that will hopefully help join the dots:
1. Retainer INCORRECTLY ASSEMBLED.
2. Retainer being properly placed 1
3. Retainer being properly placed 2
4. Retainer properly placed and ready for correct reassembly of bearing assy.
5. Bearing all positioned - retainer to be snapped into lower section.
6. All together and gliding smoothly.
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I'm not sure what you mean by middle picture. The intent of the photos was to show a crappy Chinese design and assembly. The two halves are just stacked on top of each other.
 

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212025

This image - and no I'm NOT seeing a poorly designed assy - it might be poorly designed overall but that picture my friend is of AN INCORRECTLY ASSEMBLED bearing!! - exactly what Ive been talking about in a couple of posts.

LOOK at my series of pics to realise that plastic ring should be on top of another entire metal race which provides the bearing surface. Once all together properly it all glides very nicely. Again take a look at my series of pics.

I have to also point out that this design isn't unique in any way to the KL - it's a standard type of design for strut type suspension.
 

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212028

IF this pic is of it all assembled on the strut (hint: the spring is giveaway that it is...) then it seals completely 100% that the issue is incorrect assembled bearing - in fact the entire lower part OF the bearing is missing - only half of it is there so no wonder it was working like crap. Those balls shouldn't be visible - a metal part similar shape to the upper part but smaller diameter so it fits INSIDE the upper part should be in there - with the plastic ring THEN snapped in place to hold it all together.

I work on jet engines for a living but even average joes should be able to see what I'm talking about.
 

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1. The THREE parts of the entire strut top bearing / mount assy.
2. Same pic with the bearing DISASSEMBLED (the bearings themselves are in a plastis cage and can be lifted out as a fourth part of the assembly).
3. Not really relevant - my work tool kit.
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