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So what I’m trying to get straight is ,the OP me and some others were discussing the fact that we bought the Cherokees new not used and have these issues with the warping and heavy rusting. It appears that your problem is not the same as ours because your vehicle was not new like ours , it was used and was a press car that was beat on by multiple people who probably destroyed the rotors on yours from abuse that’s why they are warped . And you never said yours are rusting and falling apart like the OP started the discussion about.
My next statement is a fact unless someone can set me straight, how can your Cherokee be built November 2017 and be a 2019 model. I don’t believe any 2019’s would have an in service date of January 2018, that would be a 2018 model.
Possibly but there's no way to prove that. The vehicle drove fine at first for me.
 

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Thank you for the info, the articles I saw in early 2018 January - February gave a timeline of a couple months or so from the time of writing to availability. But I also never thought about the in service date of a press car being so early and still being sold to the public, but that does make sense. I knew they had an early model year release but also didn’t know they were selling 2018’s and 2019’s new at the same time. That’s why I said someone correct me . You stating it took 90 seconds of searching to find the date, I searched for longer then that now and still never found and exact release date for the 2019 model. So I’m curious if anyone else with a 2019 model NON press car was also built and released so early.
Yes I believe there were people starting to get theirs in Jan 2018. Based on my build sheet I think it was built on the normal assembly line in Belvedere. I'd rather not give out my VIN.
 

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Yes I believe there were people starting to get theirs in Jan 2018. Based on my build sheet I think it was built on the normal assembly line in Belvedere. I'd rather not give out my VIN.
That response was to Turbo 2.0 and anyone ELSE who purchased 2019 models and I never asked for your personal information, including your VIN. I asked a general question if other people had purchased 2019 models early in 2018 so that everyone including me can be more informed about this weird new trend of Automotive Companies releasing model years several months before the new model year, and to clarify if NEW 2018 and 2019 models were being Ordered or sold at the same time (Not to be confused with new models being sold while still clearing out old models that the Dealers still have on the lots)
 

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That response was to Turbo 2.0 and anyone ELSE who purchased 2019 models and I never asked for your personal information, including your VIN. I asked a general question if other people had purchased 2019 models early in 2018 so that everyone including me can be more informed about this weird new trend of Automotive Companies releasing model years several months before the new model year, and to clarify if NEW 2018 and 2019 models were being Ordered or sold at the same time (Not to be confused with new models being sold while still clearing out old models that the Dealers still have on the lots)
I don't know for sure but I would assume there may be a bit of overlap at the end of production where some dealers would let people order a 2018 and others would order a 2019. I would think any overlap would be very small, there is probably a cutoff date that FCA imposes for dealers where they close orders of 2018 and switch over to 2019.
 

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I bought a 2016 TH new, and off the lot I had brake/vibration problems. I got it into the dealer the same week and they ended up replacing all 4 rotors. They said "because it had sat for several months on the dealer lot they were too rusted to be used". My driving habits with this car are minimal, I work from the home besides the occasional meeting, random store trips, etc, I manage to drive about 1-2 days a week in it, for about 6500miles/yr (I live in the country so it's a trip to go anywhere). Either way it's consistently 1-2 days a week, I've always had/have a sports car, so my driving style is very spirited with hard braking into corners etc. I'm not light footed. The car is also garage parked 100% of the time, and it has seen minimal snow/salt. Standard midwest rain. Okay, so that was the past 2+ years. About 8 weeks ago I started noticing a slight sound sometimes when accelerating from a stop or more specifically taking a hard turn real slow, I was thinking it was a joint/knuckle/something and wasn't overly worried about it. About 4-6 weeks ago the noise started to get worse. About 4 weeks ago I noticed it was everytime I braked and after letting up off the brakes. By this point the noise was a very distinctive metal->metal brake/scraping noise. I was thinking maybe I had a stuck caliper or something. Noticed some light rust around the hub of the outer rotor, but didn't bother to inspect the inner. By this point my braking power in the car was noticeably diminished. I stuck to driving the car once a week until I could get into the dealership today... Sure enough the inner rotor on all 4 wheels was nearly 100% rusted, despite the outters being fine-ish. See attached pic from the dealer. I thought well clearly this is a defect, I have ~16k miles on this car/brakes, I drive it weekly, the outters are fine, it should be covered under my 10 year bumper to bumper warranty? Nope. The cause of my brake problem is "I don't drive the car enough - I need to put at least 12k miles on it a year"... Was the most absurd thing I've ever heard. I literally have a stack of rotors in my garage aging 2-10years that have less rust then these. I have a vehicle parked outside that hasn't moved in a year that looks better then this. Clearly this is the same issue that happened when I got the car, off the lot of the dealer, and now slowly/rapidly-lately, happening again. I don't know if it's the rear dust shield that traps moisture in too well, or if somehow my inner pads aren't contacting well enough, or the metal/materials are deficient. But the dealer wanted 850$ to replace all 4, and after a heated debate, I left with my car and no work done. The problem is it takes me so long and so much of my time to drive to the dealer, two trips cost me more time then it would be if I replaced all of them myself (around 400ish in parts).



My problem/questions here are... Is this a known "feature"? Is there any hope I have of escalating this within Jeep to get it covered? Is it a problem with the metal they use on the rotors themselves maybe? Should I just replace them myself and not try to mess with the dealer anymore? I had a great experience with this dealer getting things fixed when it was less than a year old, but now I'm into a purchased_from_them 10yr bumper-to-bumper extended warranty, the experience is different. Should I file complaints elsewhere? This is definitely a major safety issue.


FYI pic was taken after about a 100 mile hard drive, I guess the little bit of shine you see there was all it managed to actually break free in that time.



Any advice?


Thanks.
What we need to do is start a class action lawsuit. I have a 2014 and have had to change them three times now — due to rust. I have a 2003 wrangler with 300000 miles and have only changed them once. Same place same amount of driving. This is a design flaw.
 

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Might as well include the tone rings in each wheel hub and the wheel hub.
The wheel hub is bare steel, it WILL rust just like the rotors. The only difference is you can't see the wheel hubs.
When they get rusty enough they will break the tone rings. Fairly common where lots of salt is used.
When I wanted to replace my wheel hubs I wanted to coat them with something to prevent corrosion.
I know powder coating doesn't work, I put brand new rear brake drums on my Olds. Had them powder coated. They are now rusty.
Of course that was probably 15 years ago so maybe that doesn't count.
Never did figure out what would work as a rust preventive coating.
Any effective steel coating should be applied at the factory, then press in the tone ring.
The brake rotors in my 2014 TH rust, more when it is humid, less when it is dry. Just what I learned in High School Chemistry.
So I go for test drives to deter the rodents, de-rust the rotors and charge the battery.
If FCA ever has reasonable quality control and designs and manufactures parts to last we wouldn't be able to afford the vehicle.
The market is very competitive, make and sell something inexpensively and make your profit selling parts and paying for the labor to replace the inexpensive parts.
Back when I was working on Military stuff that was Mil Spec and tested multiple times throughout its manufacture, the parts still failed.
I think Murphy is winning.

My recent solution when I bought my 2014 TH was to place a Factory Order.
Jeep was equipped just like I wanted, it was only driven by somebody from the truck to the shop.
The transmission "learned" my driving style. My Jeep was never used for test drives.
Rotors didn't get rusty, battery didn't discharge, the tires didn't get flat spots sitting for months on the lot and the cowl under the wiper blades didn't get filled with tree seeds and leaves.

So now I am doing my own custom destruction by going off road. That is the price of having fun.
I have destroyed every vehicle I have owned, my Cherokee won't be any exception.
 

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What we need to do is start a class action lawsuit. I have a 2014 and have had to change them three times now — due to rust. I have a 2003 wrangler with 300000 miles and have only changed them once. Same place same amount of driving. This is a design flaw.
Buy better rotors???😎
 

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Check this Web site: How to Prevent Brake Rotor Surface Rust | PowerStop.
Then I went here for my 2014 TH:
Looks like these don't rust. I don't understand how the friction surface could be coated?
Seems to me they would still rust.

This is the rest of the story: 2018 Jeep Cherokee North. Rear Rotors completely rusted
The inboard side of my rear brakes rotors were so rusty they no longer contributed to good braking. Replaced the rotors.
 

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Looks like these don't rust. I don't understand how the friction surface could be coated?
Seems to me they would still rust.
The friction surface would be kept clean just by driving/braking. It's the other surfaces on the rotors that would truly benefit from the coating. :cool:
 
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Brake rotors once used are basically bare steel. The heat from braking and the constant grime on them from the road would 100% affect any coating. I can guarantee after a rainfall that my rotors will have some rust. Brake once and it's pretty much gone. Friction from the pads will 100% remove any coating on that surface.

That being said, my 2016 Trailhawk went to get brakes replaced in 2018 and when they did it I had horrible vibration. I went back twice before I told them to shove it and I went on Rock auto and bought heavy duty slotted/drilled rotors and ceramic pads. Never had an issue again. I also completed the break in procedure that came with my pads which makes me wonder if that wasn't followed by the dealer
 
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