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After 400k miles your worried about it now? Personally I wouldn’t change a thing you’ve been doing. Let the thing operate as designed. But that’s me…


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2016 Jeep Cherokee Latitude 2.4l - 400,000+ miles
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
For a delivery job, even a small increase in gas mileage can add up to a significant amount over time.
Personally, I wouldn't do it because it also disables the stability control, and that's a safety compromise I wouldn't make.
For a delivery job, even a small increase in gas mileage can add up to a significant amount over time.
Personally, I wouldn't do it because it also disables the stability control, and that's a safety compromise I wouldn't make.
I pulled the fuse and have noticed an increase in fuel economy. I have not had any handling issues. Acceleration is the same. Turning is the same. 75mph is the same on the freeways. As I said earlier, the next jeep cherokee I will get will only be front wheel drive as I do not require four or all wheel drive. But that will not be until I get 500,000 miles.
 

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Going to a FWD would not make a lot of sense, the mileage penalty is very little and you lose a fair amount of ground clearance. On the freeway the 4x4 cherokees are usually in FWD mode anyways, you also lose out on selec terrain as well if you go FWD
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Going to a FWD would not make a lot of sense, the mileage penalty is very little and you lose a fair amount of ground clearance. On the freeway the 4x4 cherokees are usually in FWD mode anyways, you also lose out on selec terrain as well if you go FWD
Going to a FWD would not make a lot of sense, the mileage penalty is very little and you lose a fair amount of ground clearance. On the freeway the 4x4 cherokees are usually in FWD mode anyways, you also lose out on selec terrain as well if you go FWD
I am confused now. A previous poster said that the vehicle was always in "All Wheel Drive". But I notice that the the rear seemed to kick in when going slow over a speed bump. I have no use for the select train as I am on roads only.
 

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The previous poster was me. At low speeds when starting out the AWD system is always active. Once moving and underway and at highway speeds it transitions to FWD mode.

The difference in fuel economy is minimal FWD vs 4x4 but it's up to you, you can buy whatever you like
 

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I pulled the fuse and have noticed an increase in fuel economy. I have not had any handling issues. Acceleration is the same. Turning is the same. 75mph is the same on the freeways. As I said earlier, the next jeep cherokee I will get will only be front wheel drive as I do not require four or all wheel drive. But that will not be until I get 500,000 miles.
Why a Cherokee next?
With your kind of use, doesn't a hybrid make much more sense? Something like the rav4 Hybrid, where you get more cargo room, 42mpg in the city (twice that of the Cherokee) and 38 on the freeway, considerably more than with any configuration Cherokee. And you get the reliability of Toyota. Their hybrids are especially known to be very reliable and long-lasting. Taxis and rideshare drivers around here mostly use Toyota hybrids as vehicles. For them, 400,000mi not uncommon, but for the Cherokee... You're the first I have heard of on the forum or otherwise. Maybe Desoto has a couple of cherokees around those miles in his fleet (or used to? ), but I don't remember reading something like that, it would have stood out to me.
 

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Why a Cherokee next?
With your kind of use, doesn't a hybrid make much more sense? Something like the rav4 Hybrid, where you get more cargo room, 42mpg in the city (twice that of the Cherokee) and 38 on the freeway, considerably more than with any configuration Cherokee. And you get the reliability of Toyota. Their hybrids are especially known to be very reliable and long-lasting. Taxis and rideshare drivers around here mostly use Toyota hybrids as vehicles. For them, 400,000mi not uncommon, but for the Cherokee... You're the first I have heard of on the forum or otherwise. Maybe Desoto has a couple of cherokees around those miles in his fleet (or used to? ), but I don't remember reading something like that, it would have stood out to me.
When this subject came up, I wanted to tag Desoto to find out what kind of mileage they eventually got out of their KL taxis, but he hasn't been around in a long time adn then I forgot. I'll try a tag now ( @Desoto ). He did mention many times he had some with high mileage, but didn't give specific numbers, as far as I can remember.

I agree with the Toyota hybrid choice... Up here in Quebec, they are in high demand and waiting lists are ridiculous, especially for the RAV4 Prime. And this was true before chip shortages and supply chain issues.
 
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2016 Jeep Cherokee Latitude 2.4l - 400,000+ miles
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Why a Cherokee next?
With your kind of use, doesn't a hybrid make much more sense? Something like the rav4 Hybrid, where you get more cargo room, 42mpg in the city (twice that of the Cherokee) and 38 on the freeway, considerably more than with any configuration Cherokee. And you get the reliability of Toyota. Their hybrids are especially known to be very reliable and long-lasting. Taxis and rideshare drivers around here mostly use Toyota hybrids as vehicles. For them, 400,000mi not uncommon, but for the Cherokee... You're the first I have heard of on the forum or otherwise. Maybe Desoto has a couple of cherokees around those miles in his fleet (or used to? ), but I don't remember reading something like that, it would have stood out to me.
Yes a hybrid would work. Electric not so much. Range is limited. The downside to hybrids are higher up front cost plus the cost of battery cell replacement. But now that gasoline is so expensive due to misplaced energy policy, it may be time to reconsider. But I still have a lot of life left in the Cherokee. I hope to get up to 500,000 miles. The best thing to be environmentally sensitive is to keep a vehicle longer.

On a side note - I like Toyotas. I drove them for years off road in Africa, Mid-East, S. America and in China. The old models were very dependable and the Highlux makes a good attack vehicle that can defeat a HumVee!!!!!! As proven.
 

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The best thing to be environmentally sensitive is to keep a vehicle longer.
Not arguing at all, but remember President Obama's "Cash for Clunkers" (AKA "CARS").

The Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) is a voluntary incentive program designed to encourage consumers to trade in older, less fuel-efficient cars and trucks for newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles.

The criteria in 2009 was:

...eligible trade-in vehicles must have a combined city/highway fuel economy rating of 18 miles per gallon or less, be in drivable condition, be less than 25 years old...

That's when the average economy of a new vehicle was around 22.4 MPG. The average combined fuel economy in 2021 is looking to be around 25.7 MPG. If CARS were renewed today, the combined city/highway fuel economy rating would be around 21-22 MPG. According to the EPA, the 2014 4WD 3.2 got 22 MPG.

So Cherokees are borderline "clunkers"! :)

I know yours is a 2.4L so there's another year or two before official "clunker" status.

Of course, none of this nonsense takes into account the pollution generated during the manufacture of a new vehicle and disposal of the old.

Full data here:
CARS:

2009 Fuel Economy:
.

2021 projected Fuel Economy:

2014 Jeep Cherokee Fuel Economy:
 

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Yes a hybrid would work. Electric not so much. Range is limited. The downside to hybrids are higher up front cost plus the cost of battery cell replacement. But now that gasoline is so expensive due to misplaced energy policy, it may be time to reconsider. But I still have a lot of life left in the Cherokee. I hope to get up to 500,000 miles. The best thing to be environmentally sensitive is to keep a vehicle longer.

On a side note - I like Toyotas. I drove them for years off road in Africa, Mid-East, S. America and in China. The old models were very dependable and the Highlux makes a good attack vehicle that can defeat a HumVee!!!!!! As proven.
Ya, traditionally hybrids have been significantly more expensive than the non-hybrid equivalent, but these days the price differences aren't as large and can be more than made up for in fuel savings.
For instance, the Cherokee currently starts at MSRP of almost $28k, whereas the Rav4 Hybrid starts at right under $30k, so a difference of ~$2000.
With your use style and the current gas prices, you'd make that difference up in less than a year of driving since the Rav4 gets about 20mpg MORE in the city.
Definitely, right now is not the time to be buying a new (or used) vehicle. Everything is so expensive, but if you can make it with the Cherokee another couple of years, hopefully prices will become a bit more reasonable. And by then hybrid tech will be even better and the price difference will be even smaller ;)
Well, that's my plan anyway, in case you hadn't guessed :D

Don't get me wrong, would I love a TRD Offroad 4Runner? Absolutely, but my pocketbook says that's a pipe dream...
 

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2016 Jeep Cherokee Latitude 2.4l - 400,000+ miles
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Not arguing at all, but remember President Obama's "Cash for Clunkers" (AKA "CARS").

The Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) is a voluntary incentive program designed to encourage consumers to trade in older, less fuel-efficient cars and trucks for newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles.

The criteria in 2009 was:

...eligible trade-in vehicles must have a combined city/highway fuel economy rating of 18 miles per gallon or less, be in drivable condition, be less than 25 years old...

That's when the average economy of a new vehicle was around 22.4 MPG. The average combined fuel economy in 2021 is looking to be around 25.7 MPG. If CARS were renewed today, the combined city/highway fuel economy rating would be around 21-22 MPG. According to the EPA, the 2014 4WD 3.2 got 22 MPG.

So Cherokees are borderline "clunkers"! :)

I know yours is a 2.4L so there's another year or two before official "clunker" status.

Of course, none of this nonsense takes into account the pollution generated during the manufacture of a new vehicle and disposal of the old.

Full data here:
CARS:

2009 Fuel Economy:
.

2021 projected Fuel Economy:

2014 Jeep Cherokee Fuel Economy:
I just changed the passenger side motor mount. It took me an hour and a half because I had to figure out what to remove to access the mount. Turns out the easiest way is to remove the top part of the air filter canister and the air filter, disconnecting the flow to the engine. Then suck out the coolant and remove two screws and pull up to pop the grommet holder. Lay the coolant tank over the air box (clean out the air box of any fluid once finished). Then only six screws to remove to take out the mount. The motor was jacked for support. Once I put in the new motor mount, I thought I had bought the wrong mount because the screws did not reach the motor. I took it out and discovered that the old mount was so shot that it was two inches lower. So I jacked the motor up a couple inches and all went back together easy! Now everything is quit again. No rattle on acceleration. So I am good for another mile or two.

I love the old Toyota Land Cruiser CJs. I had many adventures in them. Everybody I knew wanted a Land Cruiser ove a Land Rover in the bush. Toyota was much more reliable. One time I left camp with my usual four spare tires. And then I had five flat tires! Days before they found me finishing the last of my spy novels. The good days when time was well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Ya, traditionally hybrids have been significantly more expensive than the non-hybrid equivalent, but these days the price differences aren't as large and can be more than made up for in fuel savings.
For instance, the Cherokee currently starts at MSRP of almost $28k, whereas the Rav4 Hybrid starts at right under $30k, so a difference of ~$2000.
With your use style and the current gas prices, you'd make that difference up in less than a year of driving since the Rav4 gets about 20mpg MORE in the city.
Definitely, right now is not the time to be buying a new (or used) vehicle. Everything is so expensive, but if you can make it with the Cherokee another couple of years, hopefully prices will become a bit more reasonable. And by then hybrid tech will be even better and the price difference will be even smaller ;)
Well, that's my plan anyway, in case you hadn't guessed :D

Don't get me wrong, would I love a TRD Offroad 4Runner? Absolutely, but my pocketbook says that's a pipe dream...
Toyota has decided to push for hydrogen vehicles. That would solve the rare earth element problem and not bog down the electric grid with car charging. I do not think electric vehicles are the long term future.

Maybe I can make my Cherokee last until the Toyota Hydrogen vehicles? Funny that we would read about Hydrogen vehicles in Popular Mechanics back in the 1960's and there have been attempts to make it go. So if we are going to fund electric infrastructure, we might as well go for hydrogen stations too.
 

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I just changed the passenger side motor mount. It took me an hour and a half because I had to figure out what to remove to access the mount. Turns out the easiest way is to remove the top part of the air filter canister and the air filter, disconnecting the flow to the engine. Then suck out the coolant and remove two screws and pull up to pop the grommet holder. Lay the coolant tank over the air box (clean out the air box of any fluid once finished). Then only six screws to remove to take out the mount. The motor was jacked for support. Once I put in the new motor mount, I thought I had bought the wrong mount because the screws did not reach the motor. I took it out and discovered that the old mount was so shot that it was two inches lower. So I jacked the motor up a couple inches and all went back together easy! Now everything is quit again. No rattle on acceleration. So I am good for another mile or two.

I love the old Toyota Land Cruiser CJs. I had many adventures in them. Everybody I knew wanted a Land Cruiser ove a Land Rover in the bush. Toyota was much more reliable. One time I left camp with my usual four spare tires. And then I had five flat tires! Days before they found me finishing the last of my spy novels. The good days when time was well spent.
I need to replace that mount, along with the transmission mount on the underside (at least that's what I was told by the dealership), but I was quoted almost $2k, so I have been ignoring it...
 

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Toyota has decided to push for hydrogen vehicles. That would solve the rare earth element problem and not bog down the electric grid with car charging. I do not think electric vehicles are the long term future.

Maybe I can make my Cherokee last until the Toyota Hydrogen vehicles? Funny that we would read about Hydrogen vehicles in Popular Mechanics back in the 1960's and there have been attempts to make it go. So if we are going to fund electric infrastructure, we might as well go for hydrogen stations too.
I think electric vehicles are the near term future (near term being the next 20-50 years). Rivian went public today and already has a market cap of 85 BILLION... Tesla's is currently over 1 trillion...

The people with the moneys think electric cars are the future, that's for sure.

Even if hydrogen as a fuel is the future, the cars will still be electric. They will just use fuel cells to generate electricity instead of batteries. Hydrogen ICEs aren't as efficient as electric motor + hydrogen fuel cell
 

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2016 Jeep Cherokee Latitude 2.4l - 400,000+ miles
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I need to replace that mount, along with the transmission mount on the underside (at least that's what I was told by the dealership), but I was quoted almost $2k, so I have been ignoring it...
The passenger side motor mount was a hundred bucks at advance auto and the change out was simple. I avoid the dealer. You need to get or borrow a floor jack. You need and an e socket set - 12 bucks on Amazon for a 3/8 drive set. You could just buy a single, but for 12 bucks you have a set. Regular socket set with a 6 inch extension. I did not change the transmission mount. The vibration went away after I changed the mount. Allow a couple of hours and go slow. It took me an hour and a half from start to finish after cleanup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I think electric vehicles are the near term future (near term being the next 20-50 years). Rivian went public today and already has a market cap of 85 BILLION... Tesla's is currently over 1 trillion...

The people with the moneys think electric cars are the future, that's for sure.

Even if hydrogen as a fuel is the future, the cars will still be electric. They will just use fuel cells to generate electricity instead of batteries. Hydrogen ICEs aren't as efficient as electric motor + hydrogen fuel cell
The only way electric vehicles make it is the fake economy where we subsidize electric vehicles and we whack the knees of traditional fossil fuels in order to make the fuel more expensive. The ICE was not efficient a hundred years ago, but has become more efficient with time. Batteries are an environmental disaster. The good news is that I will not live long enough to have to pay the piper!
 

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Not arguing at all, but remember President Obama's "Cash for Clunkers" (AKA "CARS").
The Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) is a voluntary incentive program designed to encourage consumers to trade in older, less fuel-efficient cars and trucks for newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles.
The criteria in 2009 was:
...eligible trade-in vehicles must have a combined city/highway fuel economy rating of 18 miles per gallon or less, be in drivable condition, be less than 25 years old...
Of course, we all know that it really was a thinly disguised effort to prop up the teetering new car industry, bring them back to profitability, and allow the government to sell all its stock... :cool:
 
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Yes a hybrid would work. Electric not so much. Range is limited. The downside to hybrids are higher up front cost plus the cost of battery cell replacement. But now that gasoline is so expensive due to misplaced energy policy, it may be time to reconsider. But I still have a lot of life left in the Cherokee. I hope to get up to 500,000 miles. The best thing to be environmentally sensitive is to keep a vehicle longer.

On a side note - I like Toyotas. I drove them for years off road in Africa, Mid-East, S. America and in China. The old models were very dependable and the Highlux makes a good attack vehicle that can defeat a HumVee!!!!!! As proven.
My Toyota Prius is over 400k with no hybrid battery replacement. My wife's is over 200k. I don't know anyone in Terre Haute, Indiana who's ever had a hybrid battery replacement. Yes, the hybrid costs more up front, but it pays for itself at 75k on the gas savings. Don't rule it out on the battery replacement issue!
UmpJJ
 

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My Toyota Prius is over 400k with no hybrid battery replacement. My wife's is over 200k. I don't know anyone in Terre Haute, Indiana who's ever had a hybrid battery replacement. Yes, the hybrid costs more up front, but it pays for itself at 75k on the gas savings. Don't rule it out on the battery replacement issue!
UmpJJ
...unless you live in a hot climate. I had a Civic Hybrid. Batteries crapped out at 5 years. Just can't handle the AZ heat. Had an 8-year warranty, so it was covered. However, the repair ticket had a number well north of $2,500. Even if fuel prices are going up that's still a lot of gas!

Obviously, I sold that vehicle not long after the battery replacement. No way I was going to fork out that kind of money out of my own pocket for new batteries. And BEV's can be worse! Take this, for example:


OK, a bit of a stunt. But $22,000 USD is a good benchmark for what happens to EVs (Teslas, anyway) when their batteries finally crap out. So now you have a toxic battery bank to dispose of AND the rest of the car too! :)

Here's another data point for plug-in BEVs and hybrids:


The California grid can't handle existing loads, yet they are pushing for more EVs!

So great for you in Indiana. Probably great for almost anywhere in the midwest. But power-starved hot climates are another story altogether.

See that light at the end of the tunnel? That's the electric train coming at you! Better hope it runs out of juice before it hits you!!
 
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